Data Up

May 29, 2014

I remember the good old days

Back in early 90’s

The internet was new

Everyone was trying to get online

And we were all using…..

Dial up

Honey…

I just dialed up the internet

I am going to run to the hardware store

We should be connected….

By the time I get back

Yawn…….

After tolerating the dial up

For several years

The phone company

Came up with a new way

Of delivering the internet over copper

Welcome to the world of DSL

A big small step forward

Is there anyone out there still using DSL?

As we continued to thirst for

Faster access to information

Fiber was introduced

While copper was like driving down

A one lane road

Fiber was like driving on

A 24 lane highway

However;

As access to information

Was getting faster and faster

The cost was getting

Higher and higher

Deregulation was introduced

To bring competition to the field

Competition was designed to control prices

For a time

This apparently was not happening

What should we be looking at…

When we are buying access to information

Do we look for the lowest price?

Do we pay the higher price?

Is more better?

Are all speeds the same?

Should I want a faster download speed?

Or

Faster upload speed?

These are all questions everyone should be asking

We find

That many people are not asking these questions

Advertising is designed to

Spark an interest

Make people call

Get customers in the door

But as we know

Cheaper is not always better

You have to understand

What are your needs

There is no one size fits all solution

At HBS we listen

We evaluate what you are currently doing

Determine how to deliver

What you want

Designed to meet your needs

Several years back

Businesses were paying over $1000 a month

For fast data access

Slowly the prices began to come down

As competition entered the field

But companies were still paying

$600 – $700 a month for fiber

Enter…..

Comcast and Fios

You say Tomatoe ….

I say Tamatoe….

Both are good companies

Making a push to

Saturate the commercial market

Looking to capitalize on price and speed

Comcast and Fios

Are both tripping over themselves

Offering high speed data access

At a fraction of the cost

There are currently big savings

To be found in the data delivery field

HBS represents both Comcast and Verizon

Our services extend to lighting up

A center city building

Bringing access to all the tenants

To bringing phone and data capabilities to your office

Many clients are beginning to use Comcast and Fios

For redundancy

(As a fail over should their T1s or PRI go down)

Some keep the voice on their T1s or PRIs

And move their data to Cable and Fios

Not only will we guide you to the best solution

We will manage the installation

Delivering the product to your location

Getting you up and running

Providing service support

As the need arises

HBS is here

To guide our clients thru the

Maze of information

Delivering smart solutions

To your business

Advertisements

As reported in Philly.com

NEW YORK (AP) – Electricity prices are probably on their way up across much of the U.S. as coal-fired plants, the dominant source of cheap power, shut down in response to environmental regulations and economic forces.

New and tighter pollution rules and tough competition from cleaner sources such as natural gas, wind and solar will lead to the closings of dozens of coal-burning plants across 20 states over the next three years. And many of those that stay open will need expensive retrofits.

Because of these and other factors, the Energy Department predicts retail power prices will rise 4 percent on average this year, the biggest increase since 2008. By 2020, prices are expected to climb an additional 13 percent, a forecast that does not include the costs of coming environmental rules.

The Obama administration, state governments and industry are struggling to balance this push for a cleaner environment with the need to keep the grid reliable and prevent prices from rocketing too much higher.

 
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“We’re facing a set of questions that are new to the industry,” says Clair Moeller, who oversees transmission and technology for the Midcontinent Independent System Operator, which coordinates much of the electric grid between Minnesota and Louisiana.

Coal is the workhorse of the U.S. power system. It is used to produce 40 percent of the nation’s electricity, more than any other fuel. Because it is cheap and abundant and can be stored on power plant grounds, it helps keep prices stable and power flowing even when demand spikes.

Natural gas, which accounts for 26 percent of the nation’s electricity, has dropped in price and become more plentiful because of the fracking boom. But its price is on the rise again, and it is still generally more expensive to produce electricity with gas than with coal. Also, gas isn’t stored at power plants because the cost is prohibitive. That means it is subject to shortages and soaring prices.

During the brutally cold and snowy winter that just ended, utilities in several states struggled to secure natural gas because so much was also needed to heat homes. Some utilities couldn’t run gas-fired plants at all, and power prices soared 1,000 percent in some regions.

As Indiana has reduced its reliance on coal to 84 percent from 97 percent over the last decade, its power prices rose far faster than those of its neighbors and the rest of the country.

That makes things tough on customers, especially big power users like Rochester Metal Products Corp., in Rochester, Indiana. The hulking furnaces it uses to melt scrap iron consume enough electricity to power 7,000 households.

“As Indiana’s price of electricity becomes less and less competitive, so do we,” says Doug Smith, the company’s maintenance and engineering manager.

Burning coal releases toxic chemicals, soot and smog-forming chemicals, as well as twice the amount of carbon dioxide that natural gas produces. The Supreme Court last month gave an important approval to one Environmental Protection Agency clean-air rule. That cleared the way for a new rule expected to be announced by President Barack Obama early next month.

This rule, the first to govern emissions of carbon dioxide from existing power plants, could accelerate the move away from coal – if it survives the legal and political challenges that are sure to come.

Already, the current rules are expected to force power companies to shut down 68 coal plants across 20 states between 2014 and 2017, according to Bentek Energy, a market analysis firm.

The Energy Department estimates coal plants with the output to supply 33 million homes will close by 2020.

“We haven’t operated at those low levels (of generation) for at least 30 years,” says MISO’s Clair Moeller.

To meet high demand this past winter, American Electric Power, which serves 5 million customers in 11 states, needed to run 89 percent of the coal plants it will soon have to shut down, says AEP CEO Nick Akins.

This raises concerns that the power system soon won’t have enough wiggle room to handle extreme weather, making blackouts more likely.

“It’s a warning of what may be to come,” Moeller says.

EPA administrator Gina McCarthy, responding to critics, notes that pollution also imposes costs on the economy because it harms human health and the environment. And she has also forcefully promised that the coming carbon dioxide rule will keep costs in check and power flowing.

“EPA is not going to threaten electric reliability,” she told a gathering of executives in Houston in March. “That is our No. 1 priority.”

Richard Sedano of the Regulatory Assistance Project, which advises officials on regulatory policy, says the transition to cleaner sources can be smooth with proper planning.

States, utilities and the federal government have helped reduce the need for more power plants through efficiency programs and standards for energy-conserving lights and appliances. Utilities are building new transmission lines and updating grids. And customers are generating more of their own power with solar panels and managing their consumption through digital meters and other technology.

Also, power prices across the U.S. are relatively low compared to those in the rest of the developed world. Adjusted for inflation, the national average residential price is nearly 30 percent lower than in 1984.

___

AP Writer Rick Callahan contributed to this story from Indianapolis. Jonathan Fahey can be reached at http://twitter.com/JonathanFahey

Read more at http://www.philly.com/philly/business/20140521_ap_891faa766ac6481e83c27218163d9f69.html#tolTWlyZPxKedr5v.99