Online Auctions

March 31, 2011

The deregulated energy market is causing a big buzz in this area. In the spring of 2010, NJ opened up deregulated opportunities to the residential market.

In January 2011, PA opened up the Peco territory to deregulation after a 5 year moratorium.

As the result, the market has been flooded with companies and individuals trying to capitalize on these opportunities.

Online Auction opportunities are now available. All you have to do is type buying deregulated energy online into your Google page and you will have multiple selections.

Also many companies have been promoting a Multi-level marketing approach to set up a grass roots effort in hopes of gaining penetration in the market.

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As more consumers have grown more comfortable with on line purchasing, it seemed natural that this avenue would be an effective marketing option.

The only problem we see is that when buying energy in the deregulated market, you are dealing with a commodity. This puts a whole new spin on the opportunity.

This week, we would like to take a look at on line auctions.

Below is a plus-minus list we have developed to help you make an objective decision about purchasing energy on line versus using an independent broker.

On Line Auctions:

Plus

  • Feel like you are getting a good deal by participating in an ecommerce transaction
  • Potentially lower price by doing the ecommerce transaction 
  • Potentially easier transaction since there is limited contact with 3rd party energy suppliers
  • Electricity is a commodity and customer’s management feels this is best process for doing transaction

 

Minus

  • Can be more challenging to negotiate terms & conditions  
  • Potentially less leverage with suppliers since there is no personal interaction
  • Difficult determining what factors are included in the price.
    •  Is it fully loaded? (contains 7% loss transmission and sales tax)
    •  Is it a fixed rate or variable rate?
  • How do you know when is the best time to buy
  • Online auctioneers are brokers approaching the same providers we would be using.
  • Many on line auction companies do not have any information on their website regarding the management of the company

 

Dealing with an Independent Broker (Hutchinson Business Solutions)

 

Plus   

  • We represent all the major 3rd party providers selling energy in deregulated sates
  • We offer personal service, individually marketing your account to these providers
  • We monitor market fluctuations and discuss timing with our clients
  • We offer fixed price solutions (Other options available for large volume users)
  • We make sure all prices received are fully loaded and are an apples to apples comparison to your local utility’s price to compare
  • Due to our business relationships, we bring leverage to the deal
  • We assist with customer’s legal team in negotiating the business terms of the contract as they may apply
  • We provide options, defining the best terms and conditions and service the account throughout the term of the contract, addressing issues as they arise
  • We have been advising customer risk management strategies in the deregulated markets for over 10 years.
  • Opportunity to outsource many of the tasks involved with the energy procurement process while retaining the control and final decisions on any potential transaction

 

Minus

  • The energy market is in a growth mode, many new faces and the information is sketchy.
  • You must be sure to deal with a reputable company who will represent your best interest
  • Many of the new companies are offering variable rates

 

At first glance you may think this overview is biased.

Yes, we are an independent broker. We take pride in the value we have brought to our clients in the deregulated market.

We have just seen too much abuse. The deregulated energy market is an unknown.

We take time to explain how the market works with each client. We want you to understand this concept and feel comfortable with your purchase.

Each account is unique. There is no one size fits all solution.

There are great opportunities for savings in the business market.

Know the facts!!!!

Look to ask the right questions.

Let HBS be your eyes and ears….

While you continue to do what you do best….

Run your day to day business.

To learn more about deregulated energy opportunitiews for your business email george@hbsadvantage.com

Visit us on the web www.hutchinsonbusinesssolutions.com

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Note: With the current deregulated market opportunities now being presented to many business that qualify, the market has been inundated with new sales personnel. I found this article provides on objective overview of questions you should ask and details you should know before making a decision.

There are many companies offering variable electric rates. I would not recommend this solution at this time.

With natural gas prices being the lowest they have been in the last 3 or 4 years, there are great opportunities to lock into a fixed price electric contract for a 1 or 2 year period.

By Carl Shaw

With the deregulation of energy in many parts of the US, competition is now allowed between energy companies to provide electricity at discounted rates directly to their customers. These Energy Service Provider Companies (ESCOs) are licensed by individual states and are required to adhere to the applicable regulatory guidelines set by the Public Service Commissions (PSC) or Public Utility Commission (PUC).  Customers (end-users) also have the opportunity to work with electricity brokers or consultants who can compare different offers and provide additional services to help manage your monthly energy spending and costs.

If you are a business spending a minimum of $3000 a month  on your electric or natural gas bill, you may qualify to choose your electric or natural gas supplier in deregulated markets, which could create savings opportunities. Companies that can control or manage their electric consumption to use more electricity in the off-peak hours will find the greatest opportunity for savings. In deregulated markets, you now have a choice and can choose lower energy rates without any risk or local service change.

Your local energy service providers buy natural gas and electricity on the open market at wholesale prices based on the current market conditions and then bill their customers at increased rates to include margins and/or service fees.

Independent Deregulated brokers can put your company in a competitive position by leveraging extensive buying power to help you develop energy supply procurement programs. They can conduct an unbiased rate and tariff analyses that may result in substantial savings to you. 

Due to the current economic conditions and the complications deregulation has caused there are many new energy advisory companies popping up, so be sure to know all the facts before making any decision.

When choosing a qualified utility tariff analysis & rate optimization firm to represent you, you should be aware of a few things:

First, be sure that the price you are quoted from your local provider includes all charges. Should you be talking to a consultant or broker, make sure the price is “fully loaded” meaning, does it include the 7% loss allowance (to deliver 100,000 kWh of electric, the providers must actually send 107,000 kWh, for there is a 7% loss in transmission)? Also does it include the local sales tax?

In PA, you must also ask if the price includes GRT (gross receipt tax) and RMR (reliabilty must run). RMR is a pass thru charge from the provider that allows them to meet peak demand periods when they must use additional resources to meet this demand. This is normally found during the summer months.

All these important components should be included in the quote from your deregulated provider to make an accurate comparison. These components are included in your price to compare from your local provider.  Often, companies will provide a low end quote without including sales tax and a load allowance. Be sure you are comparing apples to apples. Often when these figures are included, their real quote is much higher.

Does the company providing your quote have an Energy Information Management System in place, to make sure that you are getting the best available rate?

Are they shopping your account to more than 1 provider. Each provider has a sweet spot (a market they are most competitive in). An independent broker who knows the market will be able to identify these providers and work to get the best price.

Information is power. Knowing what questions to ask will save you time and money.

There are opportunities to save from 10% to 25% in the deregulated electric market depending on your usage patterns.

When making a final decision, know that you are dealing with a commodity and timing is everything. Market fluctuations may happen on a daily basis.

I think we just dodged a bullet! Last week the meteorologists were having a field day tracking this massive storm that was supposed to hit the east coast. High winds, heavy rains. Normally, when we get a bye, the storm sweeps out into the ocean. This storm actually went inland, west of the I95 corridor. Sad to say, they did get substantial flooding.

Why am I talking about the weather, you may ask? Because this is my article, I can choose a topic. Seriously! … Because weather plays a very big part of monitoring natural gas commodity cost.

The current natural gas prices are still the lowest they have been in the last 4 years. September’s NY Index price (the price that providers buy gas) was $.39 cents a therm compare this to $1.41 in July 2008. Quite a difference! Why, you may ask?

First of all, natural gas storage levels continue to be at a 5 year high. Add to that, the shale natural gas that been found in western PA. They are saying this could provide natural gas to the US for the next 100 years.

It is the old supply and demand theory, until the market deems it appropriate to ignore.

For now, market activity show that this is a great time to be buying gas in the deregulated natural gas market. Remember, that since deregulation, the local providers are no longer in the supply business. Therefore they charge you a default rate, which in normally higher. They buy natural gas wholesale and bill their customers’ retail.

HBS puts our clients in a wholesale position. Our clients are finding saving from 10% upto 20+%, depending on who your local provider is.

Since 30% of the electric is generated from natural gas, it also plays an important influence to the current market electric prices. They are also at a 4-year low.

To qualify your commercial natural gas or electric bill should be a minimum of $3000 a month each. Many of our clients are finding substantial saving in the deregulated utility market.

Should you like to know more about savings in the deregulated natural gas and electric market email george@hbsadvantage.com or call 856-857-1230.

Posted by Nicole on August 27, 2010 at 10:00 am as appeared in Rainy Day Saver

For years, utility companies had a monopoly in a number of areas: electricity and gas, finance, transportation and communication. But in the past decade, federal and state governments have chosen to deregulate certain utilities and encourage free market competition. Why wouldn’t you want the freedom to choose which company provides your electricity, especially if the rates are cheaper than the one company that had control of the market for decades?

A co-worker recently mentioned that she was switching utility supply providers from PSE&G, which was the only electric and gas provider for households across northern New Jersey for ages.  These energy utilities have supply and delivery charges, at different rates, depending on how much electricity or gas units are used. By changing the supply provider, the per-unit charge will be reduced from ~.12 to ~.09. It doesn’t sound like a lot, but it will make a big difference in the winter, when the heat is on, and in the summers, when air conditioning use is in full force.

There are a number of alternative energy providers out there, and it may pay for you to check out their rates and compare them to your current utility provider. For us, if we switched our energy supplier, PSE&G would still provide the method of delivery through its power lines and natural gas piping; those costs will be included on your bill. But the delivery charges are generally lower than the supply charges.

Regulation History

The initial outlay for all of the communication, electric and gas lines crisscrossing America was a lot of money for the companies who decided to invest in these burgeoning markets. To protect the companies’ investments, the federal government regulated these industries, eliminating competition. While the intent was good, this led to the monopolization of these industries and a lack of choice for consumers, who were forced to accept whatever rates were charged.

This eventually led to companies having too much of a say within the government regulatory committees, and consumer interests fell by the wayside. Eventually, a deregulation movement started in the 1970s, affecting transportation and, to a lesser degree, energy companies. Over time, each state has made the decision whether to deregulate or leave the old regulation policies in place.

A number of states (including my state of New Jersey) have deregulated both natural gas and electric utilities; some just offer one or the other; and then there are the nearly two dozen that still heavily regulate the industries.

Our Perspective:

Deregulation began in 1997 to bring competition to the utility market. If you are a business and you natural gas and electric bills are currently rnning more than $5000 a piece, you should be looking at the opportunities for savings.

Both natural gas and electric market prices are at the lowest they have been in over 4 years. Or clients are saving from 10% upto 25% based on their usage patterns.

To learn more email george@hbsadvantage.com. We offer a free review of your current cost and will find the right supplier for your company to maximize savings.

The deregulated utility market has presented a great opportunity for savings over the last year. For the first time in 3 to 4 years, market prices have been less than the providers’ prices, aiding in a windfall to those looking to save money on utilities.

 If you have been tracking natural gas prices, you would see that the market has dropped close to 20% since the end of June 2010.

 Natural Gas

With the steady fall of natural gas prices, HBS has been advising clients to float the market index position to take advantage of the current market prices. If you are a PSEG customer and chose to float the wholesale market over the past 12 months, you would have realized a 17% savings. Not bad!!!  South Jersey Gas clients would have saved 8%.

When speaking to our clients, we still offer an option to fix the price for a 12-month period, however it doesn’t make too much sense to fix a price that is actually higher than the price to compare that the clients have been paying over the last 12 months. Why is the price higher? Because the future market still shows that prices will go up.

Some clients may choose to fix the price for they want certainty in their cost. They do not want to be effected by market fluctuations. However if you lock the price, you are unable to change the price should the market continue to go down. By floating the market index, you can take advantage of the lower price and should the market turn and start to shoot up, you will have the option to lock in a price at a later option.

Electric

The electric market is directly affected by the natural gas market prices for 30% of electricity is generated by natural gas. So natural gas is commonly used as a market indicator. With the current fall of natural gas prices, electric prices continue to fall and have become even more competitive.

The electric market is completely different than the natural gas market. While natural gas prices change monthly with the local provider based on market conditions, the electric prices are fixed from June till May.

Every February, the state holds an auction for those selling electricity in New Jersey. The local providers buy electricity on the open market and blend the results with the electric it has purchased over the last 2 years. So the current market prices that the local providers charge are based on a blended price from purchasing electric over the last 3 years. They take these results and then present a proposal to the BPU (Board of Public Utilities), as to the summer rates (June till Sept) and winter rates (Oct to May) they wish to charge. Both the summer rates and winter rates have defined on-peak and off peak pricing.

As a result each account is charged differently based on their usage. A company with more off peak usage will actually be paying less than a company whose prime usage is during the daytime when on-peak charges are used.

Fixing your electric cost in the deregulated market offers a flat rate pricing no matter when you use it. This has offered a great savings opportunity due to the current market downturn. HBS clients are realizing saving from 10% to 20% on current flat rate pricing.

Should you like to know more about saving in the deregulated utility market, email george@hbsadvantage.com or call 856-857-1230.

PSEG Electricity

August 13, 2010

As reported by PSEG

About Deregulation

Before Deregulation 

Prior to New Jersey’s restructuring, PSE&G was responsible for generating electricity, transmitting the power to all regions of their service territory, distributing the power to the individual homes and businesses, and billing and service issues.  In addition, they were also responsible for all repairs to the electric lines and equipment.

After Deregulation

As a result of the New Jersey Energy Choice Program, the different responsibilities of the utilities were “unbundled” and the power industry was separated into four divisions: generation, transmission, and distribution, and energy services. The generation sector has been deregulated and, as a result, utilities are no longer the sole producers of electricity. The transmission and distribution sectors remain subject to regulation – either by the federal government or the New Jersey Board of Public Utilities.   No matter which electricity supplier you choose, PSE&G will continue to service the transmission and distribution sectors of your electricity.

Competition is allowed between companies to provide power at discounted rates and superb customer service directly to customers. These companies are licensed by the state of New Jersey.  You also have the opportunity to work with an electricity broker or consultant who can compare different offers and provide additional services to help manage your energy spending.

In most cases, PSE&G will continue to send you your utility bill.  So the only thing that changes if you shop for a better rate is that better rate.

Our Perspective:

Deregulation of utilities has open the door to great opportunities for savings if you are a commercial or industrial customer using over $5000 a month of electric.

The local provider (PSEG and AC Elecric) buy energy on the wholesale market and then bills their clients at retail prices. Hutchinson Business Solutions (HBS) puts our clients in the wholesale position.

The savings fall to the bottom line.

HBS is an independent energy management consultant who has strategic partnerships with all the major deregulated energy providers selling energy in NJ and PA. Our clients are finding savings ranging from 10% upto 25% in the deregulated energy market.

Each account is unique. Your current pricing is based on summer/ winter pricing and also on peak and off peak usages. We will do a complete evaluation of your annual usages and shop the market to find the best provider that will offer low fixed priced savings.

To learn more about deregulated saving email george@hbsadvantage.com

Just the Facts!!!

July 16, 2010

With the current electric market prices being very desirable, deregulation has hit full stride in New Jersey.

If you are a business spending over $3000 a month on electric, you will find real savings by shopping your account with one of the 8 to 10 deregulated providers selling electric in NJ. Hutchinson Business Solutions is an independent energy management consultant who represents all of the major deregulated providers selling electric in NJ. We have been bring deregulated savings to our clients for over 10 years.

 If you are not currently participating in the deregulated savings opportunity, the timing could not be better.

 Just a word of precaution!

Due to the current market growth there are many new faces showing up hawking the merits. Be sure to know all the facts before making any decision.

First, the price to compare from your local provider includes sales tax. Should you be taking to a consultant or broker, ask if the price is fully loaded. ie: does it include the 7% loss allowance (to deliver 100,000 kwh of electric, the providers must actually send 107,000 kwh, for there is a 7% loss in transmission), also does it include 7% sales tax.

Both these components are included in the local provider price to compare.

We see many companies that fail to include these items in their presentation and therefore you are not comparing apples to apples. There are times we found that when you actually add these 2 factors, the price is higher than what you are currently paying.

Know the facts.

Ask the right questions.

There are opportunities to save from 10% to 25% in the deregulated electric market depending on your usage patterns

Remember… The local provider buys electric on the wholesale market and then bills their customers retails pricing. HBS puts their clients in the wholesale position.

To learn more email george@hbsadvantage.com or call 856-857-1230.

Visit s on the web www.hutchinsonbusinesssolutions.com

By Chrysa Smith

It’s been said that choice is the ultimate luxury. Since 1999, New Jersey businesses and residents have had the luxury of choosing which utility company from which to purchase gas, electricity, and heating fuel; but with choice often comes challenge. Along with their new options and the predicted benefits of a more competitive marketplace, New Jersey residents have also had to deal with the changes and questions raised by the state government’s deregulation of energy providers.

The Balance of Power

In 1999, the New Jersey Board of Public Utilities (NJBPU)—the governing body for electric, oil and natural gas services—introduced a bill to deregulate the state’s energy industry for residential customers. (New Jersey’s commercial energy market had been opened up earlier in what some say was an attempt to keep local corporations happy and committed to staying put.)

The goal of the Electric Discount and Energy Competition Act (EDECA) was to enable New Jersey energy consumers to shop around and chose the energy provider that best suited their budget and service requirements. The free-market rationale hinged on the prediction that enough healthy competition between providers would keep prices down while offering better service and reliability to customers. Under the auspices of the federal Department of Energy, New Jersey took measures to safeguard free market competition for electricity and gas, including the requirement for the NJBPU to “unplug” power stations with higher costs than other available energy sources.

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According to Betty Kennedy, public relations coordinator for Conectiv Power Delivery, an independent utility provider based in Carney’s Point, New Jersey. “Up till 1999, when the state voted to restructure the energy industry, each company had a specific service area.”

Conectiv—which services eight counties in southern New Jersey—claims that the deregulation has reduced their customer’s rates by 10.2 percent, saving them a cumulative $290 million during the years from 1999 to 2003.

But the story is a bit more complex. Conectiv, and the states other 21 licensed electric suppliers and 29 licensed natural gas suppliers are, as their names indicate, suppliers. They provide the hardware—the lines and cables—and once those are in place, they also provide the power that flows to New Jersey commercial and residential customers. That power may have been purchased from companies several states away, or it could come from oil, coal or renewable energy sources. Energy may even be bought and sold much like the stocks in an investment portfolio. If it’s important for a customer to know where the cool flow from their central air system comes from, or the juice that runs the building elevator, post-deregulation, that customer now has a voice.

According to Terry Moran, manager of Retail Choice for Public Service Electric & Gas (PSE&G) in Newark, New Jersey’s largest energy provider, “Since the transition period for New Jersey, the largest change is that we no longer own generation. We are now a pipes-and-wires company.”

Enter the ESCOs

Though the playing field has changed somewhat, the delivery companies—called Energy Service Companies, or ESCOs – have remained essentially the same. Since deregulation, it’s the transmission that has changed. Out-of-area transmission companies, called third-party suppliers, are now in competition with area companies who once dominated their own market.

“The restructuring act has allowed New Jersey to move forward to look for better prices in the state,” says Kennedy. “Our customers pay less than they did in ’99.” This has been accomplished, thanks in part to the annual Basic Generation Service, or BGS, auction. Each February, according to PSE&G spokesperson Karen Johnson, transmission companies gather together to offer energy packages to service providers. Suppliers can pick up an energy contract for a year or two, or more at wholesale auction.

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“For the customers that have chosen to stay with [us],” says Johnson, “we secure the power through the annual energy auction that allows them to buy in a wholesale [market], where prices are competitive. PSE&G is the utility that is part of the Public Service Enterprise Group (PSEG) parent company, who also owns PSEG Power—the unregulated generation side.”

And, says Kennedy, much like commodities of all kinds, the buying can be ‘locked in’ at a specific rate—called fixed pricing—or float with the market value through its natural cycle of ups and downs—called variable pricing.

Not a Flawless System

While the provision of greater choice and potentially lower costs seems appealing, the program has not been without its problems. According to a report published by The New Jersey Public Interest Research Group’s Citizen Lobby and Law & Policy Center in Trenton, “New Jersey pays 50 percent more than the national average for our electricity. And energy providers, for the most part, are offering the same old fossil-fuel and nuclear-generated electricity.” For the programs first four years, the rates were frozen for electric utilities, and some customers actually saw savings of 10 percent on their electric bills. Yet now, as pricing caps come off kilowatt rates, it remains to be seen what the full affect will be.

“One of the biggest fallacies of deregulation,” says Janet Garofalow, assistant vice president and manager of sales and marketing for Castle Power LLC—a Harrison, New York-based fuel oil and natural gas service provider with a satellite office in Englewood—”is that we can’t guarantee that we can save our customers money in comparison to the utility commodity cost when they fix a price at a certain time. We can’t predict what the market will do going forward.”

Garofalow goes on to explain that to a large extent, the market is controlled by the weather. “In the winter, one reason for gas prices rising is the cost of transportation for the gas, due to increased demand. In the winter of 2002, when we never wore a winter coat, pricing came down.” To a large extent, the energy market is a gamble in commodities futures—where knowledge of the market and good planning come into play.

Maneuvering Through the Maze

One of the biggest attractions to third-party energy suppliers has been the advent of aggregation. And it may just be one of the largest benefits to multiple dwelling communities sharing real estate management companies. According to Alyssa Weinberger, director of regulatory affairs for Hess Energy Marketing in Woodbridge, “Buying bulk would be advantageous. With an aggregation of individual customers into larger groups, you can get better deals.”

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Hess—along with several other suppliers who deal with commercial and industrial customers—have done just this for multiple dwelling communities, and even area school districts, in order to reduce costs. Management companies should be aware of these and other options for energy conservation under current energy systems.

Most ESCOs and third party suppliers will tell you that their marketing efforts have not been anything like those of the deregulated phone companies, and that the resulting switching of suppliers—at least on the residential side—has been marginal. Right now, the BPU estimates that third party suppliers represent less than six percent of service to gas customers and fewer than 3.5 percent for electric supply switchers.

According to Johnson, PSE&G currently has 1.6 million gas customers and two million electric customers. “Some have both gas and electric,” says Johnson. “We serve about 75 percent of the state’s population on a north-south diagonal that follows the New Jersey Turnpike.”

“The percentage of customers who have changed is not large,” adds Moran. “On the electric side, most of those who have switched have been the largest customers. We roughly have about 18 percent of our [megawatt] load switched. For gas, we have roughly 30,000 customers who have switched to third party suppliers.”

If you think your association might benefit from joining that percentage, all it takes to make a change is a phone call and a signed contract—which some suppliers say can be done by a board member. Yet, in this transition period, and in the age of all too common legal proceedings, having the input of an informed accountant and an attorney review would be prudent. Especially in the case of buying power for entire communities, the stakes are high, contracts are involved and costs of litigation even greater.

“You need a service provider who you can go to and ask questions,” Garofalow adds, “Although [the energy business] isn’t rocket science, it is complex.” Before your board even thinks of making any changes in your utility provider, it makes sense to be sure that the people responsible for the purchase of energy understand the terms, the bills and the contracts.

According to Moran, “Billing can be done in a few different ways. For Basic Generation Services (BGS), all charges can be contained in one utility bill. Third party suppliers have a variety of options that are set forth in their contracts.”

Like a fixed mortgage, a fixed rate is fairly straightforward, and can be budgeted for accordingly. For a variable rate, it helps to know the index to which the rate is tied. According to Weinberger, “Some large customers have been put on hourly pricing versus a fixed rate—the advantage being that you pay for what you really use, with the ability to see where spikes are.”

Eric Hartsfield, a spokesperson for the NJBPU, indicates there are many options. “In the case of a condo, you may have one company providing service for the common/general areas, while another may provide service to the individual unit owners.”

Other Considerations

It also helps to be informed about the latest programs from providers that may benefit your community down the road.

“We recommend that dual-fuel boilers be put in if possible and if it makes economic sense to the customer,” says Garofalow—providing the option of burning natural gas or alternate fuel as the state of the market may dictate. Programs like the New Jersey Clean Energy Program (www.njcleanenergy.com) offer multiple promotions that provide cash incentives for changing systems that are cleaner or more efficient. So, when a community looks at their energy costs, they might consider replacement time for heat pumps, air conditioning systems and boilers in addition to their bills. If timing is right, there could be savings all around.

Information is out there, however, in the form of conferences, customer awareness programs and directly from the BPU (www.bpu.state.nj.us). The more informed the management company, condo or co-op board, the easier it will be to maneuver through this kilowatt maze without it becoming a drain on an association’s time and budget.

To find out more about saving opportunities in the NJ deregulated utility market email george@hbsadvantage.com or call 856-857-1230.

Chrysa Smith is a freelance writer and a frequent contributor to The New Jersey Cooperator.

Deregulation FAQ.

May 24, 2010

As reported in NJ Electricity Review

New Jersey Electricity Review

Your Current Electric Provider
Since New Jersey restructured its electricity market, the incumbent providers (PSEG, JCPL, Atlantic City Electric (Conectiv), Rockland Electric) are now solely in the business of managing the lines and wires portion of your electricity service. They are not in the business of offering competitive supply prices. However, they have been given the responsibility to provide high default rates for those business consumers who have not chosen a competitive supplier.
 
Why should I get off of the Default Rate?

There is a misconception in New Jersey that your current provider will be upset if you choose another company to supply your energy. This could not be more untrue. The incumbent providers (PSEG, JCPL, ACE, Rockland) are regulated lines and wires companies whose revenues and profit margins are managed by the state. They do not receive profits for the supply portion of the bill and would rather see all of their customers receive supply service from alternative providers so that they can focus on the reliability and customer service of the power lines.

However, because deregulation is a fairly new concept, the New Jersey State Public Commission Board has mandated that the incumbent providers provide a default service for those customers who are slow to choose a competitive supplier. Due to recent market conditions, the fixed rates that are available in the competitive market are significantly lower than the high default rates, by as much as 15-30% .

 
What Does Deregulation Mean to Me?The deregulated energy market in New Jersey provides the opportunity for all businesses to experience huge savings in their energy spending. The hurdle is knowing when and how to see these savings. Fixed generation rates, bandwidth limitations, ancillary charges, congestion fees, and blend-and-extend price adjustment clauses are just a few elements worth understanding to realize your potential savings.
 
How Can I Save Money?In order to see the maximum savings it is essential to work with a firm who represents you, not the provider, and who are experts in all deregulated energy markets, electricity contract negotiations, and the natural gas market..

By representing your company or organization we will force several providers to compete for your business resulting in lower rates and more favorable contract concessions. We will provide you with a full savings analysis that will compare your current default rate versus the low fixed rates we are able to find. Once the contract is executed we will continue to monitor the market on your behalf and look for opportunities to renegotiate and lower the rate even further.

 

Should you like to know more about opportunities to save in the NJ deregulated natural gas and electric market email george@hbsadvantage.com