On August 1 1999, New Jersey implemented electric deregulation in its state, opening its borders to competition and lower electricity prices. Electricity can be provided more cheaply in New Jersey where there is a number of competitive suppliers in the marketplace. Electric consumers need not change their electric supplier (it is the same electricity) and they only need to choose their electric provider. These electric providers buy electricity in bulk at competitive prices and redistribute savings to their customers.

Deregulated Electric and Gas

Natural Gas and Electric competition has substantially benefited industrial electric and gas consumers in the states of New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania and Delaware.

Hutchinson Business Solutions (HBS) is an independent broker representing all the major deregulated providers in this area. We will provide a free cost analysis of your commercial / industrial annual electricity and natural gas supply expense. 

Your local providers purchase natural gas and electric in the wholesale market and then sells it to their customers at retail prices. HBS puts our clients in a wholesale position and the savings will fall to your bottom line.

To obtain your free analysis on your commercial, industrial or business electricity email your contact information to george@hbsadvantage.com.

In these hard economic times, Why Pay More!

Contact us today. HBS provides corporate utility financial solutions

 

By REBECCA SMITH  as reported in Wall Street Journal

Slack demand for electricity across the U.S. is leading to some of the sharpest reductions in power prices in recent years, offering a break for consumers and businesses who just a year ago were getting crunched by massive electricity bills.

On Friday, the nation’s largest wholesale power market serving parts of 13 states east of the Rockies is expected to report that electricity demand fell 4.4% in the first half of the year. That helped to push down spot market prices by 40% during the first half of this year.

[Electricity Prices Plummet]

Wholesale electricity — power furnished to utilities and other big energy users — cost an average of $40 a megawatt hour in the region, down from $66.40 a year earlier. The price declines in this market, which extends from Delaware to Michigan, come on top of a 2.7% drop in energy use in 2008 over 2007.

The falloff in demand represents a reversal of what has been one of the steadiest trends in business. For decades, the utility sector could rely on a gradual increase in electricity demand. In 45 of the past 58 years, year-over-year growth exceeded 2%. In fact, there only have been five years since 1950 in which electricity demand has dropped in absolute terms.

But this year is shaping up to have the sharpest falloff in more than half a century, and coming on top of declines in 2008, could be the first period of consecutive annual declines since at least 1950.

Dramatic price reductions don’t immediately mean lower power bills for all consumers. That’s because many customers pay prices based on long-term contracts. But lower prices will have a softening effect over time.

In California and Texas, a combination of cheap natural gas and lower industrial demand is putting pressure on prices.

In the Houston pricing zone, which has many power-gobbling refineries and chemical plants, the spot market price was $61.82 in June, versus $129.48 a megawatt hour a year earlier. Power demand in Texas is down 3.2% so far this year due to business contraction and reductions in employment which are causing many households to economize.

Just a year ago, many businesses and residential customers were reeling from electricity prices on the spot market that had spiked to historic highs, driven by high fuel prices and hot summer weather. Some businesses curtailed their operations because electricity and natural gas were too pricey.

[Electricity Prices Plummet]

But the flagging economy has resulted in a slump in demand that has jolted some energy markets. American Electric Power Co. and Southern Co., for example, both reported double-digit drops in industrial electricity use for the past quarter.

Meanwhile, natural gas, which strongly influences electricity prices, has fallen below $4 per million BTUs, or British thermal units. That’s down from $12 at last year’s peak.

For many businesses, the cost of electricity represents one of the few bright spots in a dismal economy. Andy Morgan, president of Pickard China Inc. in Antioch, Ill., which makes fine china, figures his electricity cost is down 30% to 40%.

Last year, when everything was spiking, he looked at different options — including negotiating a fixed-price contract for energy with a supplier. He says he held off and now he’s happy he did.

“We’ve definitely reaped savings,” says Mr. Morgan, adding that “especially in a down economy, you’ll take whatever you can get. That’s one of the few blessings during this storm.”

Slowdowns at major industrial companies such as Alcoa Inc. help account for the decline in electricity usage this year. The recession and drop in consumer demand for products that contain aluminum has caused the company to idle 20% of its smelting capacity world-wide this year.

In the U.S. the company has cut production at smelters, which are traditionally big energy users, in New York, Tennessee and Texas. Kevin Lowery, a company spokesman, said he did not believe that Alcoa has saved much money thus far because the company primarily purchases electricity through 25- to 35-year contracts.

Steel Dynamics Inc. is benefiting from lower pricing. The company operates five steel mills, with four purchasing electricity at spot market prices in Indiana, Virginia and West Virginia. The benefit, though, is smaller than it might be because the steelmaker is producing less steel this year.

“We’re producing fewer tons, but every ton we produce we seek to minimize the costs and electricity is one of those,” said Fred Warner, a company spokesman. Its mills are running at 50% capacity this year, down from 85% capacity last year.

Some wonder whether the deregulated markets of the Eastern U.S., Midwest, Texas and California will be especially hard hit if demand comes roaring back. That’s because utilities in these markets no longer are required to build new resources. It’s left up to the power generators to determine when the market conditions are ripe.

“There’s more supply than demand and prices are really low so it doesn’t make sense to build anything,” says John Shelk, president of the Electric Power Supply Association in Washington, D.C., a group that represents power generators.

Many electricity markets throughout the country have implemented demand reduction programs that give consumers a further incentive to reduce power use. The 13-state PJM Interconnection market has been one of the most aggressive — and has seen one of the steepest price drops.

A new report from the region’s official market monitor found a strong correlation between falling prices and an increase in demand-reduction programs. In the PJM market, energy users can collect money through an auction process for pledging to cut energy use in future periods.

In May, PJM conducted an auction to ensure it will have the resources it believes it will need in 2012-13. About 6% of the winning bids came from those who pledged to cut energy use by a total of 8,000 megawatts in that future period.

Our Perspective:

For those companies faced ith rising utility prices over the past 4 years, there is finally relief in the deregulated market. Prices have fallen due to the decrease in demand.

If you look at you electric bill over the past 12 months you will see that your price to compare for electric supply was most likely over .12 cents per kWh. Current market rates will allow you to lock you supply price in the dregulated market somewhere in the .10+ cent per kWh area. This could provide a 11/2 to 2 cents per kwh savings over the next year or two.

Our clients are finding substantial savings which fall to the bottomline.

Would you like to know more? Give us a call 856-857-1230 or email george@hbsadvantage.com . Contact us for a free evaluation You will be surprised by the savings it will provide.

—Timothy Aeppel, Sharon Terlep and Kris Maher contributed to this article.

Real-Time Pricing: Now is the Time. From the September 2009 issue of Building Operating Management magazine. The facililities management resource.

Our Perspective:

Below you will find a great article providing the savings opportunity in the deregulated gas and electric market.

It is true we are finding substantial savings for our clients. Energy Prices are the lowest they have been in the last 3 to 4 years. Our clients are saving from 10% upto 25% over what they paid over the last 12 months on gas and electric supply cost.

Based on annual usage, we have seen small clients saving a couple of thousand dollars over the next year, to our larger clients saving from $90,000 upto $300,000 over the next year. 

What would be the potential savings for your company?

All you have to do is ask. There are no fees involved, the savings fall to the bottom line.

Should you like to know more about the utility savings available for your company call 856-857-1230 or send an email to george@hbsadvantage.com

Enjoy the article, click on the link provided below.

via Sagging Energy Rates Creates An Opportunity for Power Purchasers.

As reported in Huffington Green

BEIJING (AFP) – China has more than tripled its target for wind power capacity to 100 gigawatts by 2020, likely making it the world’s fastest growing market for wind energy technology, state press said.

China is aiming for an annual wind power growth rate of 20 percent for the foreseeable future, Feng Junshi, an official with the National Energy Administration, told a Beijing conference, according to the China Daily.

The new target for 2020 is up from a goal of 30 gigawatts announced by the government 18 months ago, the report said.

China currently has 12 gigawatts of installed wind power, but that is set to grow to 20 gigawatts by next year, the newspaper said.

“China is powering ahead with no visible signs of slow down,” the report quoted Steve Sawyer of the Brussels-based Global Wind Energy Council as saying.

“They intend to become the largest market in the world, very clearly, and they probably will unless things take off in the US again in the relatively near term.”

China is currently the fourth largest producer of wind power after the United States, Germany and Spain.

In addition to vast wind power facilities in its arid north and northwest regions, China is also actively building wind farms off its eastern and southern coasts.

The country is the world’s second largest energy producer, but is struggling to wean itself off its dependency on coal, which is highly polluting and blamed for emitting the greenhouse gases that cause global warming.

Our Perspective:

This is good news. China has been in an expansion mode. I have friends who go there for business and they say that construction is booming.

I am glad they are looking to alternative energy to help support this growth. Should they have relied on fossil energy solutions, they would have had 1 foot in the grave.

There is no one solution that will address our growing energy needs. There will be a combination of viable solutions, when coordinated together, will power America’s future.

Let us know your thoughts?

You may leave a comment or email george@hbsadvantage.com

 

Written by Paul Krugman  NY Times

The Geithner plan has now been leaked in detail. It’s exactly the plan that was widely analyzed — and found wanting — a couple of weeks ago. The zombie ideas have won.

The Obama administration is now completely wedded to the idea that there’s nothing fundamentally wrong with the financial system — that what we’re facing is the equivalent of a run on an essentially sound bank. As Tim Duy put it, there are no bad assets, only misunderstood assets. And if we get investors to understand that toxic waste is really, truly worth much more than anyone is willing to pay for it, all our problems will be solved.

To this end the plan proposes to create funds in which private investors put in a small amount of their own money, and in return get large, non-recourse loans from the taxpayer, with which to buy bad — I mean misunderstood — assets. This is supposed to lead to fair prices because the funds will engage in competitive bidding.

But it’s immediately obvious, if you think about it, that these funds will have skewed incentives. In effect, Treasury will be creating — deliberately! — the functional equivalent of Texas S&Ls in the 1980s: financial operations with very little capital but lots of government-guaranteed liabilities. For the private investors, this is an open invitation to play heads I win, tails the taxpayers lose. So sure, these investors will be ready to pay high prices for toxic waste. After all, the stuff might be worth something; and if it isn’t, that’s someone else’s problem.

Or to put it another way, Treasury has decided that what we have is nothing but a confidence problem, which it proposes to cure by creating massive moral hazard.

This plan will produce big gains for banks that didn’t actually need any help; it will, however, do little to reassure the public about banks that are seriously undercapitalized. And I fear that when the plan fails, as it almost surely will, the administration will have shot its bolt: it won’t be able to come back to Congress for a plan that might actually work.

What an awful mess.

Let us know your thoughts? You may leave a comment.

By MICHELLE CONLIN, BUSINESSWEEK
Posted: 2009-03-10 23:55:34

 

 
Eve Gelb’s life was once a blur of hour-and-a-half commutes on the 405 Freeway in Los Angeles. What memories: The NPR fatigue. The stale minivan air. The deep identification with the characters in Waiting for Godot. But that’s all in the past. Gelb, a project manager at a giant HMO, SCAN Health Plan, has given up her Ethan Allen-style office, yanked down the family photos, and moved into her home office. Members of the professional class normally have to beg their managers — or at least delicately negotiate — to allow them to work remotely. But in Gelb’s case, it was her boss’s idea.
SCAN is one of a growing number of companies encouraging workers to toil from home. Sure, employers have been doing this for years. But as the recession bites and companies look to save money on real estate costs, what was once a cushy perk is now deemed a business necessity. And that, along with a few choice enticements — voila!, a shiny new BlackBerry — is how companies are selling it to employees, whose emotions range from ecstasy to befuddlement.

The health-care sector is one of the few industries that is still expanding these days, and SCAN is no exception. “We needed to find a way to grow without incurring any more fixed costs,” says Chief Financial Officer Dennis Eder. To encourage more of its workforce to become post-geographic, the company has been offering free high-speed Internet access and gratis office furniture, complete with a couple of delivery guys to set it all up.

Gelb jumped at the opportunity but still found herself struggling to adjust. “I never thought to myself: What would I do with all that extra time that I wasn’t sitting in my car?” So she set about building new routines. “Instead of going on my commute in the morning, I go for a walk,” says Gelb, 40. That makes up for the cardio workout she used to get running up and down SCAN’s four flights of stairs attending meeting after meeting. Now that she simply dials in, “I don’t really move much,” she concedes. On the days when she does come into the office, Gelb shares her old digs with her three direct reports, who also work flexibly. She says they see each other more now than they did when they were squirreled away in their corporate warrens.

Still, persuading managers to embrace no-collar work isn’t always easy. Jack Weisbaum, CEO of accounting firm BDO Seidman, has spent endless hours over the past year managing what he calls the “yeah buts.” These are the old-school execs among his crew who have an arsenal of reasons why untethering workers is a lousy idea: They’ll become Facebook addicts, ignore clients, develop a bad case of alienation. Weisbaum went on the road to nearly all 37 of the firm’s offices to explain how he sees flexibility as a business strategy. He told the troops that allowing people to work where and when they want is enabling BDO to prevent layoffs. The real estate savings are a big reason for that. When BDO moves into its new Los Angeles offices in June, it will be taking over a radically reduced space. “Bricks and mortar are like a noose around your neck,” says Christopher Tower, BDO’s leader for the Western region.

“Homeshoring” has enabled BDO Seidman’s controller for the Western U.S., Grace Renteria, to essentially give herself a raise: the amount of money she saves by working at home, a café, a club—anywhere, in short, that doesn’t require a commute. There’s the $15 a day Renteria used to lay out for lunch. Then her $70 a week in gas. Add wear and tear on her Lexus LS 400. On top of that, she no longer has to lose productivity from co-worker interruptions. “I only go into the office,” Renteria says, “when I don’t have a lot going on.”

“THIS IS DESTINY”
Capital One is one of many companies where status has long been measured in square footage. The bank’s human resources chief, Matt Schuyler, has had to deal with executives made anxious by the prospect of losing their wood-paneled lairs as they begin new lives as laptop hobos. Schuyler, who is also in charge of corporate real estate, meets with them one on one, whipping out the stats showing how much a skinnier footprint benefits the bank. Then he delivers his sweetener: “The bad news is, I’m taking away your office. The good news is, here’s your new laptop and your shiny new BlackBerry.” Another enticement is the $1,000 managers can dole out to workers to freshen up their home offices. So far the company has cut 20% of its real estate costs. “This is destiny, and other companies will have to get there,” says Schuyler. “We’re at the tip of the iceberg with respect to this stuff.”

None of this is to say the corporate office will disappear. But hard times will accelerate a Digital Age makeover. Adieu to cubicle farms, fixed walls, and standing-room-only conference rooms. Hello to sliding walls, moveable furniture, and lots of lounge areas. Space will be allotted by function, not title. Square footage will be based on office presence, not rank. The flexibility will cut costs and at the same time accommodate both loud talkers and hermits. The new workplace will be less about working alone and more about working together. One thing, however, will never change: The office will remain the primary spot for meetings, collaboration, and, of course, gossip.

Our perspective:
The economy is challanging us to now think outside the box. Companies, besides fighting to survive, are still looking for the opportunity to grow and expand.
How can they be unique?
Robert Kennedy once eloquently stated that “some people look at things and ask why, I say why not?”
We got to where we are today, for we took our eye off the ball . This is not to say that we should turn our back on everything. There are many things that we can still incorporate. But it is time to also incorarate opportunities, to introduce efficiencies that will not take away from the ability to service our clients
There are only 24 hours in a day. Use our time more effectively. That is the key. Those willing to adapt will succeed.
What will we be looking at?
Teleconferencing…. Telecommuing…. Video Conferencing… Video Training
All of these play into raising efficiencies, lowering cost and challenging the norm.
Let us know your thoughts?
Should you like to knw more on incorporating these opportunities into your business? Leave a comment or email george@hbsadvantage.com

Conlin is the editor of the Working Life Dept. at BusinessWeek.

2009-03-10 23:39:19

Frigid temperatures and winter storms have blanketed the country from New Orleans to Chicago this month, weather that usually leads to a spike in the price of the most popular fuel for home heating, natural gas.

But not this year.

Natural-gas prices remain in a slump because manufacturers, which are even bigger users of gas than chilly homeowners, have cut back their operations in response to the recession. And low demand means low prices.

Associated Press

Despite a cold, stormy start to winter in much of the U.S., natural-gas prices have stayed relatively low as the recession hits industrial usage.

Despite an uptick this week, natural-gas futures have fallen 9% this month, to $5.910 per million British thermal units, and are down 16% from last year despite colder weather. Prices haven’t been this low in December since 2003.

Storage levels remain 3.4% higher than normal even after the frigid start to the season. According to federal data released Wednesday, the U.S. withdrew 147 billion cubic feet of gas from storage last week, about normal for this time of year, but less than would be expected after a bout of cold weather.

Boon for Consumers

Low prices are a rare piece of good news for consumers, who might get smaller bills this year for home heating and electricity.

But the price slump spells bad news for gas producers, who have been forced to slash spending on drilling, and for gas-producing states like Texas and Colorado, which had been shielded from the national economic slowdown by their strong energy industries.

[Natural Gas Futures]

The low prices come despite an unusually cold start to winter, which has seen rare snowstorms in New Orleans, Houston and Las Vegas, subzero temperatures in Chicago and a devastating ice storm in the Northeast.

Michael Schlacter, chief meteorologist for the forecasting service Weather 2000, said the weather so far this season has been the most extreme in at least eight years.

“Mother Nature’s doing all she can,” Mr. Schlacter said.

Manufacturing Downturn

But rising residential and commercial heating demand has run up against slumping industrial demand for natural gas, which is used to make everything from diapers to fertilizer.

“Industrial demand is going away in a big way,” said Abudi Zein, senior vice president at Genscape Inc., which monitors electricity generation and fuel supplies.

Forecasters expect the weather to warm up in at least parts of the country early in the new year, but industrial demand isn’t likely to recover for months because the recession has knocked down industries like auto manufacturing.

“We know industrial demand is going to be impacted in 2009 — it has to be,” said Dave Pursell, an analyst at energy-focused investment bank Tudor Pickering Holt & Co. in Houston. “Everything that goes into a car — steel, glass, plastic — is natural-gas intensive.”

Adding to the downward pressure on prices, natural-gas production has remained relatively high. Gas producers such as Chesapeake Energy Corp., Range Resources Corp. and Exco Resources Inc. have been slashing drilling budgets since autumn in response to falling prices. But it has taken months for those spending cuts to show up on the ground in the form of reduced drilling activity, and it will take months more for production to fall significantly.

Rebound Is Seen

Longer term, many analysts think prices are likely to rise. Tudor Pickering, for example, predicts gas will drop as low as $4.75 per million BTUs in the third quarter of 2009, but will rebound in 2010.

Subash Chandra, an analyst at Jefferies & Co., is predicting a faster recovery. Even though a lot of gas is in storage, he said, it can’t all be tapped right away, so the immediately available supply of gas is lower than many people think.

But after a year of ups and downs, no one can have much confidence in price predictions, he said. “Gas has thrown so many head-fakes in the past,” Mr. Chandra said. “Anybody who thinks they’ve had it figured out in December, even if they’re freezing their noses off, well, history tells a different story.”

Where did my day go?

November 16, 2007

 

Where did the day go? I had a whole list of things I wanted to get done but that went out the window as soon as I walked in this morning.

 

 

Sound familiar! Are you running your day or the day running you?

 Ever think of outsourcing? 

Companies have come to realize that outsourcing is a fairly powerful and effective management tool. It allows you to address an issue, provide a solution; increase efficiencies and profits while keeping your pulse on daily activities that demand your attention.

 

 

When a company approaches outsourcing for the first time the most challenging question is the most basic one:

 

Where do we begin?

 

 

 

 

A recent executive forum favored starting with generic, transaction based business processes such as finance, accounting and information technology. They felt that these fields offer quick wins, attractive returns with relatively low levels of risk.

Hutchinson Business Solutions….Your Outsource Solution

Today it is more important than ever to take an objective look at your operating expenses.

 

Below are areas with great opportunities for savings.

  • Payroll Taxes – There is a 50% chance you are overpaying payroll taxes.
  • Sales Tax – Long thought to be the “cost of doing business.”
  • Telecom – Clients are saving from 10 % to 40%.
  • Fleet Management – You can now “put your fleet in the palm of your hand.”
  • Data Solutions – Ask about our Virtual CIO Managed Service Program.
  • Utilities – Deregulated savings for large volume users.
  • Insurance – Cost continue to trend from 10% to 20% a year.

Many clients are enjoying the savings and have received refunds for overpayments.

A new global study on business outsourcing relationships finds that:

·        74% use “business outcomes” to measure performance

·        61% say outsourcing helps their companies perform better

·        74% are satisfied with their outsourcing experience

Thinking of outsourcing? Call 856-857-1230 or email george@hbsadvantage.com to discuss what opportunities are available. 

Hutchinson Businees Solutions…Your CFO on the Go

Defining opportunities today, increasing profits for tomorrow.

Take the First Step Today

November 16, 2007

HBS goes beyond the “bottom line” by introducing fresh, bold ideas that set the pace for future profitability.  Opportunities to increase profits are available; take the first step today and continue reading …

Below is an overview of some of the projects HBS has been working on recently and the opportunities presented to our clients. We invite you to be one of our success stories.

Opportunity: Payroll Tax

Client spun off from major area bank and set up new company in spring of 2004. New Federal ID numbers were issued and tax rates were assigned by both State and Federal agencies.

 Solution:

Upon reviewing the assigned tax rates, it was determined that the client made duplicate payroll tax payments in three areas. Our client received a substantial 5-figure refund from these agencies.

  

Opportunity: Voice and Data

Major South Jersey non-profit health organization invited HBS to review their current voice and data configuration and costs.

 Solution:

Multiple solutions were initiated to provide substantial savings as well as insure quality of service. All Verizon platform lines were converted to a local carrier, servicing the Verizon network, for over a 40% savings. The long distance was also ported to the same provider for a 50+% savings. Total annual savings totaled over $50,000.

  

Opportunity: Sales Tax

Major South Jersey Company, building multiple locations in three states, retained HBS to review the effects of sales tax liability in those states.

 Solution:

Upon reviewing multiple invoices of multiple vendors involved with the construction of these locations, it was determined that our client had overpaid sales tax on real property issues in all three states. Customer received over a $3m refund.

  

Opportunity: Voice and Data

Growing area Mortgage Company requested that HBS review their current voice and data configuration and costs.

 Solution: Multiple solutions were initiated to provide substantial savings as well as insure quality of service. All Verizon platform lines were converted to a local carrier, servicing the Verizon network, for over a 40% savings.  As a result of our efforts, the customer was able to cancel multiple lines that showed no usage. We are currently reviewing their long distance and data contracts – potential savings over $100,000.

Spread the good news….. share this information with a friend. 

Should you like to discuss opportunities available for your company to increase profits call us at 856-857-1230 or email george@hbsadvantage.com

 

 

 

Hutchinson Business Solutions has a 90% success rate providing savings and getting refunds for our clients.

 

Hutchinson Business Solutions…Your CFO on the Go. 

Defining opportunities today, increasing profits for tomorrow.

Visit http://www.hutchinsonbusinesssolutions.com/ to learn more about saving opportunities available for your company.

Unemployment is the 2nd  highest employer mandated tax, yet no one seems to question it.

What is your current rate?

Your Unemployment account is similar to having an open checkbook with the State:

  • The State assigns your rates

  • The State has total control of all monies in the account

  • The State determines the amount of each payment and disburses payments from this account

  • The State sends a quarterly reconciliation of all activity in the account

Would you handle your personal account this way?

How much did your company pay into Unemployment last year?

What is your reserve balance? (How much is in your State Checkbook)?

 Did You Know:

  • The State of New Jersey has a 12% error rate in the payment of unemployment claims.
    •  The state is overpaying the amount of the claim
  • The US Dept of Labor states that there is a 50% chance a company is overpaying taxes if they have been involved with a merger, acquisition or restructuring
    • All the due diligence is done prior to the above activity
    • The papers are then sent to the state to be recorded
    • Who validates that the transaction was recorded properly by the State

Hutchinson Business Solutions ( HBS ) works as an advocate for our clients. The onus is on the company to show that their rate is incorrect and that you may have overpaid Payroll Taxes.

 We have a 90% success rate 

Our team of experts deals only with Unemployment and other payroll related taxes only. We are able to look back over the past 3 to 4 years and determine if your rates were calculated properly. If there is an error, we will review the information with the client and take the necessary steps to have it corrected.

There is no upfront fee, we are only paid if there is a mistake and the client receives a refund and or credit to correct the rates. 

This is a Win / Win

  • HBS will validate your unemployment rates are correct.

  • There is no upfront cost; we work on a contingency basis.

  • These taxes have already been paid!

 You may qualify for a Refund!

Spread the good news….. share this information with a friend. 

Should you like to discuss opportunities available for your company to increase profits call us at 856-857-1230 or email george@hbsadvantage.com

 

 

Hutchinson Business Solutions…Your CFO on the Go. 

Defining opportunities today, increasing profits for tomorrow.

Visit http://www.hutchinsonbusinesssolutions.com/ to learn more about saving opportunities available for your company.