Finally

November 23, 2010

It’s been a long wait.

It has been well publicized, that in January 2011, PECO will lift the rate caps on electric prices and will be entering the deregulated market.

Just what does this mean for PECO customers?

As part of deregulation, local providers will no longer own their own power plants to generate electric. Their job is to deliver electricity to the end user, the client.

They are able to sell the supply, which they buy through an auction process, to anyone who chooses to stay with the local provider at a default price, which could be higher.

PECO is actually encouraging larger users to shop their rates with 3rd party providers. 

If your business is currently spending a minimum of $5000 a month on electricity, Hutchinson Business Solutions will now be able to help you buy your electric supply from a 3rd party supplier.

The new rates PECO will be proposing as of Jan 2011 will be tiered for certain rate classes. For certain customers the first tier is for the first 80 hours of usage per month, and is the highest rate. This can range from $0.16 cent per kwh to $0.17 cents per kwh.

The prices will be scaled down as your usages progress. The more electric you use, the more the price goes down.

PECO is only publishing these rates for 90 days. That means that as of April 1st, new prices will appear based on such potential factors as:

                                                  – How PECO needs to true-up their costs

                                                  – Current market values at that time.

 Another factor being added into the PECO price to compare is RMR (Reliability Must Run). This is a pass thru cost from the local provider for system reliability.

This means having the ability to generate electric when it is needed. Although this cost has not been defined, it could be in the $0.001 mil to $0.003 mil ranges (3 mil ie:3 tenths of a penny).

The bottom line, should you choose to stay with PECO, you could be paying higher default rates as of Jan 2011.

Each account is unique, based on their demand and usage patterns. For smaller to midsize accounts; we could see electric supply prices in the $.010 cents per kwh to $.13 cent range as a default price from PECO.

We have been working with clients in the PECO territory this year and have found significant opportunities in the deregulated electric market.

HBS clients are finding savings ranging from 10% to 20% by purchasing electric thru deregulated 3rd party providers.

Hutchinson Business Solutions (HBS) has been providing independent, deregulated energy solutions for over 10 years.

There is no upfront fee.

Our strategic partnerships allow us to represent all the major providers currently selling energy in deregulated states.

Should you like to know more about this topic, email george@hbsadvantage.com

or call 856-857-1230 

Visit s on the web www.hutchinsonbusinesssolutions.com

By Andrew Maykuth

Inquirer Staff Writer

Brace yourself for power shopping – and we’re not talking about a marathon outing at the mall.

Nearly two dozen energy companies are scrambling to sign up Peco Energy Co.’s biggest, most lucrative customers – the commercial and industrial users – in preparation for electric deregulation at the end of this year.

About 110 customers of the Philadelphia utility attended a seminar Tuesday at the Union League to learn more about the implications of electric choice. The bottom line: Large customers should shop around for power, because their competitors are, too.

“This is a wonderful opportunity for you to save money,” James H. Cawley, chairman of the Pennsylvania Public Utility Commission, told the seminar, sponsored by one supplier, GDF Suez Energy Resources.

The PUC is promoting energy choice as an option for customers to fashion a deal specific to their needs. A school district, for example, might bargain for a lower price because its facilities are closed in the summer, when power costs more. A business promoting its green image might buy from renewable suppliers that generate from wind, solar, or hydroelectric plants.

“You have a choice to get your electricity from somebody else who can be much more attentive to your individual needs, your own risk tolerance, your own environmental desires,” Cawley said.

Under the Electricity Generation Choice and Competition Act, utilities hived off their power-generation units and will now make their money strictly by distributing power on their lines.

The utilities’ rates were capped at 1996 levels to allow them to ease the transition to competitive markets.

For Peco, the rate caps will be lifted at the end of this year. Customers who don’t want to shop around can stay with the utility’s “default rate.”

For large customers, Cawley said, the default rate is likely not the best deal because it contains a significant “risk premium” for Peco to lock in prices now. Alternative suppliers are more nimble in fashioning rates to suit the needs of specific users.

“Don’t sit there and take the default rates,” he said, without endorsing any specific alternative supplier. “You’re silly to do that.”

Cawley said many customers were still confused over the roles played by the traditional utility that distributes power and those companies that generate it. Peco, as a distribution company, will still provide customer service and billing for most users.

“People don’t understand this distinction between distribution and generation,” he said. “Your electric-distribution company does not care if you shop. . . . In fact, they’d like you to shop.”

Since the rate caps came off on Jan. 1 for customers of PPL Electric Utilities, the Allentown company reported that 32 percent of its total customers have switched to alternative suppliers, according to the PUC.

But nearly 80 percent of its large commercial and industrial customers have switched. All told, 75 percent of PPL’s load – the number of kilowatt hours transmitted through its wires – is now supplied by alternative companies.

Marketing efforts aimed at Peco’s residential customers are not expected to materialize until late in the year – and officials expect only a small percentage of customers will be inclined to switch.

The reason: Though PPL’s default rate went up more than 30 percent this year, Peco’s is expected to increase only about 10 percent from current rates, Peco president Denis O’Brien said in a recent interview.

But commercial and industrial customers – who represent about 10 percent of Peco’s 1.6 million customers – are a different story.

Even a small percentage of savings is attractive to a big customer whose annual electric bill might total millions of dollars.

“The larger customers are keyed into this because it’s such a big part of their costs,” said Tom Petrella, regional sales manager for Hess Energy Marketing, which also had a Center City educational seminar Tuesday.

Many of the 21 suppliers registered with the PUC to supply electricity to large Peco customers are the marketing arms of other utilities with familiar names: Con Edison Solutions, First Energy Solutions, UGI Energy Services, and Allegheny Energy Supply Co.

Exelon Energy Co. is among the competitors selling power directly to Peco customers – both companies are owned by Exelon Corp.

Some suppliers have adopted more public marketing campaigns: PPL EnergyPlus, a sister company of PPL Electric, bought the naming rights to the new professional soccer stadium in Chester this year to help raise its profile.

GDF Suez, the company that held the Union League seminar Tuesday, bills itself as the “biggest company you’ve never heard of.”

The $109 billion French company is the world’s largest utility, has 200,000 employees, according to Forbes magazine, and is among the largest suppliers of power in the United States.

Like many suppliers, it has opened an office in the Philadelphia area.

Our Perspective:

Deregulation is about to begin in Jan 2011 for customers in the Peco territory. If you already have not started looking at the deregulated savings opportunity, now is a great time to start.

Electric commodity prices are very competitve offerring great opportunities to fix your supply price and save on your purchasing of electric for the next 12 to 24 months.

Hutchinson Business Solutions (HBS) is an independent deregulated energy consultant. We have been providing deregulated savings to our clients for over 10 years.  HBS has strategic partnerships with all the major providers currently marketing to the PA electric market.

You may ask, why should we use an independent consultant when we can deal with the energy companies directly.  The value we bring is that we are able to shop the entire market, offering an apple to apples comparison of what your current price to compare is from your local provider vs the deregulated providers.

You must be careful when comparing prices; for not every providers are including all the cost to make a correct comparison.

When speaking to the various deregulated, you must ask if the  prices are fully loaded.

In order to deliver 100,000 kwh of electric, a provider must send 107,000 kwh of electric due to the loss in delivering the electric. This cost is included in your PECO / PPL price to compare. You must verify if this cost is also included in the deregulated provider price.

Also the Peco price to compare also includes PA gross receipt tax. This also must be included.

As you can see, there are several factors that must be included to make an objective decision as to the best value. This is the expertise that HBS brings to our clients. We allow our clients to do what they do best (run the day to day business), while we become your legs and do the project for you.

There are no additional fees for our services. We receive a small residual from our strategic deregulated providers during the term of the contract. All the providers choose to use independent energy consultants; for it allows them to be more competitive in the market prices. We are not paid a salary, do not share in any of their benefits. That way, you will find that many times our prices are more competitve.  We add the benefit of  being able to define which providers are the most competitive for your unique market usage and will show you the variances in pricing.

Should you like to know more about saving in the deregulated utility market email george@hbsadvantage.com
Read more: http://www.philly.com/philly/business/homepage/20100616_Peco_Energy_customers_at_seminar_on_electrical_deregulation.html#ixzz0wVg1QQ7q
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What is Electric Choice

August 6, 2010

As reported by Pennsylvania PUC

General
   
Q: What exactly am I shopping for?
A: You are shopping for the company that supplies your electric generation. There are three parts to electric service: generation, transmission and distribution. Generation is the production of electricity. Transmission is the movement of that electricity from where it is produced to a local distribution system. Distribution is the delivery of purchased power to the consumer. 
Q: Will I be charged tax on the generation portion of the bill?
A: Yes. Taxes are included in the rate charged by a supplier. Most of the same taxes that the EDC was required to pay will be charged to the supplier. However, they may not be itemized like they were on your bill before you chose a supplier. 
Q: What is an aggregator?
A: A buying group that negotiates lower electricity prices for customers who have authorized them to act on their behalf. 
Q: How do Electric Generation Suppliers (EGSs) set their prices?
A: EGSs consider market conditions, the amount of power customers use, fuel type, terms of their agreement and other services they may provide. These prices are not subject to PUC review. If you sign up, your EGS must notify you before they make any changes to the terms of your contract. 
Q: Will my EDC charge me more for “other services” if I change suppliers?
A: In most cases, your EDC cannot increase any charges based simply on your selection of an alternative supplier. However, if you currently benefit from a special discounted rate (for instance, for having all-electric heat) and you select a new generation supplier, you may lose your discount on other parts of your electric service (including distribution and transmission charges). In this case, shopping for another supplier may end up costing you more money, even if the cost of generation is lower. 
Q: Q & A on Electricity Pricing, Electric Generation Supply, Energy Efficiency & Conservation for the Commission
A: The following questions and answers tell you how you can reduce your electricity use when demand for electricity is the greatest, often during hot summer days. This is important for two reasons. First, cutting back on your electric use will reduce your electric bill. And, second, by controlling your energy use, you can help ensure there is enough electricity for all consumers. Click here.

Energy Conservation and Energy Efficiency Information Sources. 

What You Need to Know Before Shopping for a Supplier
   
Q: What is the ‘price to compare,’ and where can I find it?
A: This is the price per kilowatt-hour (kWh) a consumer uses to compare prices and potential savings among generation suppliers (also formerly known as the shopping credit). You can find your price to compare on your electric bill. If you have questions, contact your EDC. 
Q: Where can I get information on supplier prices?
A: Each supplier’s price can be different. You can get pricing information by contacting the suppliers serving your area or click here for pricing information resources. 
Q: How will I know that a supplier is reliable?
A: Only electric generation suppliers that are licensed by the Public Utility Commission (PUC) can do business in Pennsylvania. If they are not licensed in Pennsylvania, do not sign up for service from them. 
Q: If I sign up with a new supplier, when will the switch to a new supplier start?
A: It will depend on when you sign up with a new supplier. Generally, it will take about 45 days from the time you notify your new supplier for the actual switch to occur. 
Q: Will I receive two electric bills each month if I choose a new supplier?
A: In most cases, you should be able to receive a single monthly bill from your current electric distribution company. However, some suppliers might want to bill you separately. In this case, you would receive two bills, one from the EDC and one from the supplier. 
Q: Once I select a supplier, what happens next?
A: 1) Your new supplier will notify your EDC of the change.
2) Your EDC will contact you by mail to make sure you selected this company to be your electric generation supplier. 
Q: Are there any penalties for changing suppliers?
A: If you already have an agreement with an electric generation supplier and you want to switch to a different supplier, you should carefully review your agreement with your current supplier to see if there are any penalties for early cancellation. If you are not sure, you should call your current supplier. The new supplier that you choose will not charge a fee to switch to them. If you choose to return to your Electric Distribution Company (EDC), the EDC will not charge you a fee to do so. However, if you switch back to the EDC, you may have to stay with the EDC for at least 12 months. Ask your EDC if they have a 12-month stay rule. 
Figuring Your Savings
   
Q: How do I figure my savings?
A: To estimate potential monthly savings, subtract the supplier’s price from the price to compare from your EDC. Then, multiply the difference by the average number of kilowatt-hours (kWh) you use in a month. Click here to use the online calculator to determine potential savings.

Additionally, when comparing prices, it’s also important to consider the effect of different electric programs to which you may subscribe. If a supplier offers a discount, find out what part of your bill that discount applies. For example, does it apply to your entire bill or just the generation charge? If you are a low-income customer and want to know whether you qualify for certain low-income assistance programs that help pay part of your electric bill, click here

Electric Choice Program Savings
   
Q: How much money will I save in the Electric Choice program?
A: Your potential savings will vary. The amount you might save depends on several factors, such as how much you pay now for electric generation; how much electricity you use; and the price offered by an electric generation supplier. 
Q: Who do I contact if I want to discontinue service?
A: If your EDC sends you one bill for all of your charges, you should call them. If you receive a separate bill for generation, you may have to call either or both companies. 
Q: What happens if I move outside my current EDC’s service territory?
A: If you are moving out of your current EDC’s territory, your EGS enrollment does not go with you. You need to contact your new EDC and sign up for EDC service with them. You can ask the EDC for a list of suppliers serving in their territory. Your former supplier may not be providing service in that territory, so you will need to check the list, select a supplier and contact the supplier to enroll. 
Service
   
Q: Will I have reliable service?
A: Yes. You can depend on the same reliable service from your local electric distribution company whether or not you choose a new supplier. 
Q: If one company generates my electricity and another provides the rest of my electric service, who will I call about outages or repairs?
A: You will still call your local electric distribution company about power outages and repairs. If you have questions about electric generation billing or other issues related to generation, call your new supplier. 
Q: Who do I contact if I have billing questions?
A: If your EDC sends you one bill for all of your charges, you should call them. If you receive a separate bill for generation, you may have to call either or both companies. 
Q: Who do I contact if I want to discontinue service?
A: You should call your EDC. You should also notify your supplier of the fact that you are stopping service. If you are moving within your current EDC’s service territory, you can arrange for new service at the same time and you should be able to keep the same supplier. 
Slamming
   
Q: What is slamming and how can I prevent being slammed?
A: Slamming is the unauthorized transfer of utility services without the customer’s permission. To prevent slamming, and regardless of whether you made an agreement with a supplier on the telephone, or over the Internet, your chosen supplier must send you the agreement in writing in an email, U.S. mail or in-person hand-delivery. You have 3 days to accept or decline the agreement upon its receipt. In addition, when your EDC receives notification of a supplier change, it will send you a confirmation letter. You must respond to the EDC within 10 days if the information is incorrect. During that 10-day period if you notify your EDC you did not want the change of supplier, the supplier change will be cancelled and your account will be restored without penalty. 
Metering
   
Q: Can I be in the Electric Choice Program and still benefit from a time of day meter (off-peak meter)?
A: Maybe. You must be sure to compare the rates you are being charged for off-peak service with the rate you will be charged from a competitive supplier. Some suppliers may offer lower or higher prices at different times of the day. For instance, you may be able to receive a discount for using your clothes dryer at night instead of the day, when electric use is higher. Ask the supplier if you need a special meter to take advantage of time-of-day use options. 
Q: Will I need a special meter if I choose a new supplier?
A: Not if you are a residential customer. You might, however, have an opportunity to choose to have an advanced meter. These meters allow you to record your electric use during specific time periods. If a supplier offers this service, advanced metering could allow you to benefit from special time-of-day discounts or other potential ways to save money and reduce energy consumption. You should ask a supplier, however, whether there is a charge for the advanced meter. 
Q: Will my EDC continue to be responsible for reading and maintaining my meter?
A: In most cases, yes. 
Payment Assistance Programs
   
Q: What energy assistance is available to customers?
A: LIHEAP/CRISIS program payments will cover supplier charges. However, before LIHEAP/CRISIS payments can be made to any qualified service provider, the provider must have an agreement with the PA Department of Welfare (DPW). As of June 11, 1998, no suppliers have agreements with the DPW and as a result they cannot receive program money. If you are part of the Competitive Discount Services Program (CDP), the EDC will apply the LIHEAP grant to your entire bill.

The EDCs have agreements with the DPW, but they are not permitted to provide program money to any suppliers. As a result, you may find that you have a credit with the EDC yet still owe the supplier money. 

Stranded Costs
   
Q: What are the “competitive transition charges”(also known as stranded costs) charges on my bill?
A: Stranded costs are expenses for utility plants and equipment that were built before deregulation. These costs cannot otherwise be recovered in a competitive electric market. The PUC allows companies to recover some but not all of these costs through a transition charge on electric customers’ bills. These costs are now itemized on your electric bill; however, they are not new charges. Most of these costs were part of your rates under regulation. The CTC will be phased out over time. 
Q: Do we have to pay stranded costs if we are buying generation from a supplier?
A: Yes. Stranded costs have nothing to do with who provides your generation service. All customers who receive electricity over the EDC’s transmission and distribution system pay stranded costs. In some EDC territories, these charges will disappear beginning in 2002. 
Renewable Energy
   
Q: Which suppliers use renewable energy?
A: Some suppliers use renewable resources to generate electricity by a mix of sources, or only one source, such as wind. Suppliers should be able to tell you the percent of renewable resources that is part of their generation. You may find out more about renewable resources from the Clean Air Council by calling 215-567-4004, ext. 236.

Below are press releases regarding the Pennsylvania Public Utility Commission’s involvement in encouraging renewable energy in Pennsylvania:

PA PUC Chairman Glen Thomas Says PA State Government Leads by Example by Purchasing Green Energy, Shopping for Power

PA PUC Chairman Glen Thomas Dedicates Wind Farms that Secure PA’s Status as East Coast Leader for Wind Energy, National Leader for Electric Choice

PA PUC Commissioner Fitzpatrick Unveils Largest Solar Electric Power Plant in Western PA that Further Secures PA’s Leadership for Green Energy 

Competitive Default Service (CDS) Program
   
Q: What is the Competitive Default Services Program?
A: A program created from the electric restructuring settlements that require 20% of an EDC’s residential customers – determined by random selection, including low-income and inability-to-pay customers, and regardless of whether such customers are obtaining generation service from an EGS – to be assigned to a default supplier other than the EDC. The supplier is to be selected on the basis of a Commission-approved energy and capacity market price bidding process. Currently, four (4) EDCs have programs, but none have been successfully implemented due to a lack of interest on the part of EGSs. PECO Energy, working with New Power and Green Mountain Energy, has developed a program in southeastern Pennsylvania similar to CDS. It involves non-shoppers being assigned to a new supplier for service. The supplier is not a default supplier – customers can return to PECO’s regulated generation service. In the program, suppliers provide 2% renewable energy to customers in the first year, and .5% thereafter.

See the following Dockets for more information about the CDS programs by the EDCs:

PECO – CDS BID – New Power

Allegheny Power CDS Order

Allegheny Power Amended Petition for CDS Program 2001

GPU CDS Petition – GPUE Request to Withdraw Contested Pleading 

Fuel Source Information and Power Plant Emissions
   
Q: How can I find out information about air emissions from power plants?
A: E-Grid, a database developed by U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, integrates more than 20 federal databases, provides power plant emissions data for Nitrogen Oxide (NOx – smog contributor and acid rain precursor), Sulfur Dioxide (SO2,- acid rain precursor), Particulate Matter (PM – responsible for respiratory problems, haze issues) Carbon Dioxide (CO2,- global warming gas), and Mercury (Hg- water toxicity). The database can be used for: fuel source information, analysis of changing power markets, development of Renewable Portfolio Standards, utility emission and emissions standards. Download E-GRID at www.epa.gov/airmarkets/egrid

Some more information about prices and rates.

Beginning January 1, 2011, the prices PECO and our customers pay for electricity will be based on electric market pricing, after having been capped more than 10 years. Gas and electricity will cost customers more.

At the same time, the costs to operate our systems have been increasing. Because of these increased costs, PECO has requested Pennsylvania Public Utility Commission approval of its first electric delivery rate increase since 1989 and only the second natural gas delivery rate increase in 20 years. PECO is requesting an electric delivery rate increase of about 10 percent and a natural gas delivery rate increase of about 7 percent.

On May 20, 2010 the Pennsylvania Public Utility Commission formally suspended PECO’s request to increase electric and natural gas delivery rates. Part of the standard review process, PECO’s requested increases would have become effective on May 30 with no action by the PUC. The process now provides the opportunity to formalize a schedule of next steps including public hearings. Following these procedures, price changes will become effective beginning January 1, 2011.

Excerps from 

Press Release Source: PECO On Wednesday June 23, 2010, 5:35 pm EDT

PHILADELPHIA–(BUSINESS WIRE)–In preparation for the final transition to a competitive electric market in Pennsylvania, PECO recently completed the third of four planned electricity purchases to serve customers who have not chosen a competitive electric generation supplier beginning Jan. 1, 2011.

Beginning January 1, 2011, the prices PECO and our customers pay for electricity will be based on electric market pricing, after having been capped for more than 10 years. At the same time costs to operate our electric systems also have been increasing. The effect of all of these changes on PECO electric customers will be price increases of about 10 percent. For the typical residential electric customer, the increase is about $8 more per month.

The May 2010 purchases resulted in an energy price of 7.95 cents per kilowatt hour (kWh) for PECO’s residential customers. When combined with 2009 purchases, the May purchases result in a price of 8.91 cents per kWh for PECO’s residential customers, 8.66 cents per kWh for small commercial customers, and 8.63 cents per kWh for medium sized commercial customers.

Because energy prices fluctuate, PECO is buying the electricity needed to serve customers in 2011 at four different times – reducing the risk to customers of purchasing electricity all at one time when market prices could be high. PECO will complete the remaining purchases in September 2010. The results of all four purchases will determine the exact price PECO’s customers will pay for electricity beginning Jan. 1, 2011.

“We continue to be able to purchase electricity at lower wholesale market prices, helping reduce the prices for our customers,” said Denis O’Brien, PECO president and CEO. “And we have programs available to help customers use less energy and save money.”

Our Perspective:

Now we’re getting there. As Peco begins to release information, we will be better able to determine what opportunities for savings exist in the deregulated market.

All we will need is a copy of your latest invoice and a letter of authorization, which allows us to request annual usages on your account from Peco.

HBS is an independent energy management company. We have been providing deregulated savings to our clients for over 10 years. We represent all the major providers looking to sell electric in the Peco territory.

We will define the right provider at the the right price.

To learn more email george@hbsadvantage.com or call 856-857-1230 

By Andrew Maykuth

Inquirer Staff Writer

Brace yourself for power shopping – and we’re not talking about a marathon outing at the mall.

Nearly two dozen energy companies are scrambling to sign up Peco Energy Co.’s biggest, most lucrative customers – the commercial and industrial users – in preparation for electric deregulation at the end of this year.

About 110 customers of the Philadelphia utility attended a seminar Tuesday at the Union League to learn more about the implications of electric choice. The bottom line: Large customers should shop around for power, because their competitors are, too.

“This is a wonderful opportunity for you to save money,” James H. Cawley, chairman of the Pennsylvania Public Utility Commission, told the seminar, sponsored by one supplier, GDF Suez Energy Resources.

The PUC is promoting energy choice as an option for customers to fashion a deal specific to their needs. A school district, for example, might bargain for a lower price because its facilities are closed in the summer, when power costs more. A business promoting its green image might buy from renewable suppliers that generate from wind, solar, or hydroelectric plants.

“You have a choice to get your electricity from somebody else who can be much more attentive to your individual needs, your own risk tolerance, your own environmental desires,” Cawley said.

Under the Electricity Generation Choice and Competition Act, utilities hived off their power-generation units and will now make their money strictly by distributing power on their lines.

The utilities’ rates were capped at 1996 levels to allow them to ease the transition to competitive markets.

For Peco, the rate caps will be lifted at the end of this year. Customers who don’t want to shop around can stay with the utility’s “default rate.”

For large customers, Cawley said, the default rate is likely not the best deal because it contains a significant “risk premium” for Peco to lock in prices now. Alternative suppliers are more nimble in fashioning rates to suit the needs of specific users.

“Don’t sit there and take the default rates,” he said, without endorsing any specific alternative supplier. “You’re silly to do that.”

Cawley said many customers were still confused over the roles played by the traditional utility that distributes power and those companies that generate it. Peco, as a distribution company, will still provide customer service and billing for most users.

“People don’t understand this distinction between distribution and generation,” he said. “Your electric-distribution company does not care if you shop. . . . In fact, they’d like you to shop.”

Since the rate caps came off on Jan. 1 for customers of PPL Electric Utilities, the Allentown company reported that 32 percent of its total customers have switched to alternative suppliers, according to the PUC.

But nearly 80 percent of its large commercial and industrial customers have switched. All told, 75 percent of PPL’s load – the number of kilowatt hours transmitted through its wires – is now supplied by alternative companies.

Marketing efforts aimed at Peco’s residential customers are not expected to materialize until late in the year – and officials expect only a small percentage of customers will be inclined to switch.

The reason: Though PPL’s default rate went up more than 30 percent this year, Peco’s is expected to increase only about 10 percent from current rates, Peco president Denis O’Brien said in a recent interview.

But commercial and industrial customers – who represent about 10 percent of Peco’s 1.6 million customers – are a different story.

Even a small percentage of savings is attractive to a big customer whose annual electric bill might total millions of dollars.

“The larger customers are keyed into this because it’s such a big part of their costs,” said Tom Petrella, regional sales manager for Hess Energy Marketing, which also had a Center City educational seminar Tuesday.

Many of the 21 suppliers registered with the PUC to supply electricity to large Peco customers are the marketing arms of other utilities with familiar names: Con Edison Solutions, First Energy Solutions, UGI Energy Services, and Allegheny Energy Supply Co.

Exelon Energy Co. is among the competitors selling power directly to Peco customers – both companies are owned by Exelon Corp.

Some suppliers have adopted more public marketing campaigns: PPL EnergyPlus, a sister company of PPL Electric, bought the naming rights to the new professional soccer stadium in Chester this year to help raise its profile.

GDF Suez, the company that held the Union League seminar Tuesday, bills itself as the “biggest company you’ve never heard of.”

The $109 billion French company is the world’s largest utility, has 200,000 employees, according to Forbes magazine, and is among the largest suppliers of power in the United States.

Like many suppliers, it has opened an office in the Philadelphia area.

Our Perspective:

Deregulation has recently presented great opportunities for business to find savings from 10% to 25%. The current natural gas and electric commodity prices are the lowest they have been in the last 4 years.

Remember, savings is a parity of how much you spend. We have small clients saving $5,000 to $10,000 a year, while larger clients are saving $100,000 to $200,000.

Not bad! It is like receiving a gift.

We are currently waiting for Peco to release their price to compare figure. This will serve as the basis to determone what value deregulation will bring to the Peco territory. If Peco’s prices pare to what PPL is currently charging, you will be finding savings running between 15% to 20%.

Who qualifies?

If you are currently spending a minimum of $5,000 a month on natural gas or  $5,000 a month on electric, you should be looking at the dergulated market for savings.

The first step is easy. All we need is a copy of your latest invoice from Peco. We will also need you to sign a LOA (letter of authorization), which will allow us to request annal usages for your accont from Peco.

With this information, we are then ready to spreak to the providers looking to sell electric.

Hutchinsson Business Solutions (HBS) is  an independent energy management company. We have been providing deregulated saving opportunities to our clients for over 10 years. We have strategic partnerships with all the maajor providers looking to sell electric in PA.

We know the market and we know the sweet spots each provider looks to participate in.

We will validate what you currently are paying.  Define what you will be paying, should you remain with Peco. We will present opportunites for savings in the deregulated market.

There are no fees for our services for we receive a small residual from the providers.

To learn more about dergulated saving opportunities email george@hbsadvantage.com or call 856-857-1230

Read more: http://www.philly.com/philly/business/homepage/20100616_Peco_Energy_customers_at_seminar_on_electrical_deregulation.html#ixzz0rnTAXq3t
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As reported in Northeast Energy update by Direct Energy

PECO Completes Second of Four Electricity Purchases for 2011
In the second of four purchases for the electricity to serve customers beginning in January 2011, moderate wholesale market conditions resulted in lower electricity prices compared to the company’s last procurement in June 2009. 

The September 2009 purchases resulted in a retail energy price of 9.16 cents per kilowatt hour (kWh) for PECO’s residential customers.  When combined, the June and September purchases result in a retail price of 9.41 cents per kilowatt hour (kWh) for PECO’s residential customers—or about a 4 percent increase compared to current prices. 

For the first time, PECO also purchased electricity for 2011 for its small and mid-sized commercial customers.  This recent purchase resulted in a retail price of 9.79 cents per kWh, about the same as current prices for these customer classes.

Because energy prices fluctuate, PECO is buying the electricity needed in 2011 at four different times in an effort to reduce the risk of purchasing electricity all at once when market prices could be high.  PECO will complete the remaining two purchases in June 2010 and September 2010.  The results of all four purchases will determine the price in which PECO’s customers will pay for electricity beginning Jan. 1, 2011 when rate caps expire. 

PECO is estimating an overall increase of 10–15 percent for customers once all procurements have been made.

To find out more information your electric cost beginning in Jan 2011, email george@hbsadvantage.com

Peco Deregulation

May 24, 2010

As reported by Electricitywatchdog.org

Lower My PECO BillMay 10, 2010

PECO is trying to prepare their customers for increases in their electric rates in 2011 by unleashing multiple programs.  Recently, the PA Public Utilities Commission announced that Pennsylvania utility companies will be increasing the rates for electricity delivery service in 2011.  In addition, price caps will be expiring in 2011 in the PECO area – as well as Met-Ed, Penn Electric, and West Penn – which are expected to increase default generation rates by as much as 20%.

PECO is rolling out numerous programs to help customers cope with increases including the PECO Smart Home E-Audit, Smart Lighting Discounts, Smart Home Rebates, and Smart Appliance Recycling.  Alot of smart programs, but probably the smartest way consumers will be able to reduce their electricity bill is by shopping for an alternative supplier that will offer a reduced rate versus the PECO price to compare default rates. 

PECO will continue to deliver power to those customers who they are currently delivering to as well as continue to send invoices out.    The decision to choose an alternative electric genaration company will simply be a choice to pay less.  We will be providing contact information and rates for alternative providers as we get closer to 2011.

Our Perspective:

The caps will be lifted on electric prices in Peco territory as of Jan 2011. This will present many opportunities for savings for larger users in the dergulated energy market.

Currently, clients in the PPL terrirory are finding savings of about 2 cents per kwh. We are finding the price to compare in PPL territory to be about $.105 cents per kwh. Depending on their annual usages, we have been able to find opportunities to lock the electric supply prices in the low to mid $.08 cent per kwh area.

We are currently speaking with several clients in the Peco territory and have told them to wait for Peco to release their price to compare for 2011. This will help us to use this as a basis of the opportunity presented.  Sources have told us that this information will be available by the end of May or early June 2010.

Should you like to know more about opportunities for savings in the Peco electric deregulation market email george@hbsadvantage.com

Or visit us in the web www.hutchinsonbusinesssolutions.com