Here Ye

July 23, 2015

Hear ye…. Hear ye… Hear ye……

This is to serve as notice

To all businesses in the State of New Jersey…..

Your new unemployment rates have just been mailed
By the State of New Jersey

You should be receiving your new rate notice….. Any day

Note:
All business owners have 30 days to question the new rates
you have been assigned

This is as good a time as any to verify…….

Is our new Unemployment Rate correct?

Unemployment…

Is the 2nd highest Employer Mandated Tax

By the US Government

 

Yet, people know so little about it

 

It is the only employer tax that can be controlled

 

Did you know that each claim can be worth up to $16,000????

 

Unemployment…..

Is like having a checking account with the State

 

Each year, at this time, the state sends you a notice

 

In NJ, it is called the

Employer Contribution Report

 

This report tells you…

How much money you had in your account at the beginning of the plan year

How much money you paid out in claims during the year

How much money you deposited into your account during the year

How much money is left in your account now….

 

It then goes thru a calculation based on the numbers listed above

 

As to what your new rate will be for the next 12 months

 

This new rate determines the funding level needed

To meet future claims

 

What is your rate????

 

Is your rate high or low????

 

Did your rate go up????

 

If so…You got a tax increase……

 

How do you know if your rate is correct????

 

That last question is the one question

All business owners should be asking

 

Especially if you have over 100 Employees

 

When there is a mistake in unemployment

The mistake is not on just 1 employee

It is the all factor

 

A mistake effect all your employees

 

That means the State may be taking more money

Out of your account than they should be taking

 

Remember….This is like a checking account

 

Would you miss money…..

If it was taken out of your personal checking account????

 

Who is holding the State accountable????

 

We are

 

HBS works with many established clients

Who took the time to ask the question

 

Is our rate correct????

 

Boy were they surprised…..

When we found there was a mistake

 

We went back to the State

 

Corrected the error

 

And our client received a refund

 

We are always asked how did you do that????

 

That is what separates HBS from all others

We know where to look

 

Many of the cost we work with

Most businesses take for granted

As the cost of doing business

 

Did you know……..

The state has over a 12% error rate

In the payment of unemployment claims

 

Once again…..

 

They are taking money out of your account

And they are not being held

Accountable

 

That is reason enough to ask the question….

 

Do you think you can look at our

Unemployment rate????

 

Is it correct??????

 

To learn more

Give us a call

 

We offer a free consultation

Did I ever tell you the story

 

About trying to renew

 

 

My NJ plumbing license seal

 

 

 

It was old and needed to be

 

 

Replaced.

 

 

 

Do you have about an hour?

 

 

 

It is wayyyy tooooooo long of a story

 

 

 

Without going into details

 

 

Let me just say

 

 

After many phone calls

 

 

 

 

It only took the State a year

 

 

To mail out my new

 

 

Plumbing seal

 

 

 

 

 

 

Now the State is treading on sacred ground

 

 

 

 

Each year in late July or early August

 

The State of New Jersey

 

Mails out the

 

 

 

New Jersey Employer Contribution Reports

 

 

 

To all New Jersey Employers

 

 

 

 

This form shows you how the State

 

 

Calculates your new

 

 

Unemployment Tax rate

 

 

For the next 12 months.

 

 

 

 

You have to stay with me here…..

 

 

 

 

The form shows how much

 

Your Company has paid

 

Into the unemployment fund

 

Since inception

 

 

 

It also shows the total amount of

 

Unemployment claim dollars

 

The Company has paid out

 

Since inception

 

 

 

 

Confused yet?

 

 

 

Keep reading

 

 

 

 

The bottom line

 

Shows your reserve balance

 

 

Or

 

 

How much money is left

 

 

In your account

 

To pay

 

 

Future claims

 

 

 

 

Alright….. take a breath

 

 

 

 

 

To determine your new rate

 

 

 

The State looks at your

 

Reserve balance

 

 

 

 

The State also looks at your

 

 

 

3 year taxable wage base

 

 

And your

 

 

 

5 year taxable wage base

 

 

 

 

 

 

Guess which Taxable Wage Base

 

 

The State picks?

 

 

 

 

 

If you said the higher number…..

 

 

 

 

You would be correct.

 

 

 

 

Well….

 

 

 

Guess what?

 

 

 

 

 

New Jersey will not be mailing out the

 

 

New Jersey Employer Contribution Reports

 

 

 

Any longer

 

 

 

 

You will now have to go online…

 

 

 

 

Set up an account…

 

 

 

And look up the information…..

 

 

 

 

Yourself

 

 

 

 

Did I miss that memo?

 

 

 

 

Did you miss that memo?

 

 

 

 

 

 

I bet you did not know that

 

 

 

 

Unemployment is the 2nd highest

 

 

Employer mandated tax by the government

 

 

 

 

It is the only tax

 

That you are able to manage

 

 

 

 

You do have the ability to manage

 

 

What rate your company is assigned

 

 

 

 

And

 

 

 

What dollar amount will be

 

Paid into the account

 

For the next 12 months

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Did you know

 

 

That the national average

 

 

For the overpayment of an

 

Unemployment claim is

 

 

 

Over 10%

 

 

 

 

That means the State may be paying

 

The wrong amount for an unemployment claim

 

 

 

And the money is

 

Coming out of your account

 

 

 

How do you even know your

 

Unemployment Rate

 

Is correct?

 

 

 

How do you know if your

 

 

Reserve balance

 

Is correct?

 

 

 

 

This is one of the services

 

HBS provides

 

 

 

 

We serve as a public advocate for

 

Our clients

 

 

 

 

We hold the state responsible

 

 

 

 

We verify the assigned rate

 

Is correct

 

 

 

 

We manage the payment of claims coming

 

Out of your account

 

 

 

 

Auditing each claim payment

 

 

Verifying it is the correct amount

 

 

 

 

For companies with over 100 employees

 

 

The cost savings to

 

 

 

Manage your unemployment account

 

 

Can be seen within the first year

 

 

 

 

With the unemployment fund depleted

 

 

Now more than ever

 

 

Companies should be taking steps to

 

 

Manage their unemployment accounts

 

 

 

 

 

 

To learn more contact george@hbsadvantage.com

 

 

Visit us on the web www.hutchinsonbusinesssolutions.com

Posted by: Mitchell Hirsch on Feb 17, 2011

As reported by Unemployedworkers.org

UPDATE: FEB. 17 – UNEMPLOYMENT INSURANCE SOLVENCY BILL INTRODUCED IN SENATE
Senator Richard Durbin (IL), with Senators Jack Reed (RI) and Sherrod Brown (OH), today introduced the Unemployment Insurance Solvency Act of 2011, which offers immediate tax relief to cash-strapped states and employers, preserves UI benefit levels, and creates strong incentives for states to restore their UI programs to solvency while also rewarding states that have managed their UI trust funds effectively.

In a statement, NELP Executive Director Christine Owens said, “Jobless workers, and we hope employers too, should be grateful for the leadership of Senator Richard Durbin and his colleagues Sherrod Brown and Jack Reed on the issue of unemployment insurance solvency.  Following the President’s FY 2012 budget, the introduction of the Unemployment Insurance Solvency Act sets the stage for a serious conversation on how to make sure that the safety net tens of millions of Americans have counted on during the tough times of the last few years will be financially secure into the future.”

The new bill is similar to the plan outlined by President Obama in his remarks last week, but adds further protections for benefits and additional opportunities and incentives for states to return to solvency in the long run. 

Original Post: Feb. 11

Unemployment insurance is just that — insurance — and it’s financed by premiums paid on workers’ paychecks and deposited into a trust fund.  However, the unemployment insurance (UI) trust funds in many states are not only insolvent, but now face heavy debt burdens due to their increased need for federal borrowing during this prolonged period of high unemployment.  Restoring them to financial health is essential to ensure that unemployment insurance benefits are there for workers when they’re needed, both today and in the future.  The Administration has outlined a significant framework to address the problem, which would provide needed debt and tax relief to states and businesses.

A new plan from the National Employment Law Project (NELP) and the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities (CBPP) would build on that framework, further strengthening the long-term solvency of state UI systems while avoiding benefit cuts and employer tax increases.  Workers need to pay attention to this issue.  The last time UI trust funds got hit this hard, in the 1980s, 44 states cut back benefits for workers.

Many states UI trust funds have been hit in recent years by a double-engine freight train.  First, for years many states have inadequately financed their UI funds, both by keeping their taxable wage base for UI too low relative to inflation-adjusted dollar values, and by taking a dangerous “pay-as-you-go” approach, which failed to build adequate reserves during periods of economic growth.  The graph below shows the substantial erosion in the inflation-adjusted value of the wage base that is subject to the UI taxes that fund state systems.  What does this mean?  It means that the employer of a dishwasher pays the same unemployment premium as the employer of a banker.  It does not take a degree in actuarial science to know that this is not going to work.

Value of UI Taxable Wage Base, Adjusted

And oh yeah, second — well, then came the Great Recession with millions of workers’ jobs being lost and the vastly increased need for unemployment benefits to help sustain unemployed job-seekers and their families.

Now, 30 states have exhausted their UI trust funds and are borrowing from the federal government.

The lead editorial in The New York Times yesterday, titled ‘Relief for States and Businesses’, explained the need for the Obama administration’s approach.  Here are some excerpts:

So many people now receive jobless benefits that 30 states have run out of their unemployment trust funds and are borrowing $42 billion from the federal government. Three of the hardest-hit states — Michigan, Indiana and South Carolina — have borrowed so much that they triggered automatic unemployment tax increases on employers, and the same thing is likely to happen to 20 more states this year.

….

On Tuesday, the Obama administration unveiled a smart proposal to delay those tax increases and provide some relief to both employers and state governments. Congressional Republicans reflexively objected to the idea, which could produce higher taxes in three years, but this plan provides relief that might stimulate hiring now when it is most needed.

….

Under the plan, which is subject to Congressional approval, there would be a two-year moratorium on the increased taxes that employers would otherwise have to pay to support the unemployment insurance system, which could save businesses as much as $7 billion. During those same two years, states would be forgiven from paying the $1.3 billion in interest they owe Washington on the money they have borrowed.

….

In 2014, when the economy will presumably have recovered somewhat, employers will have to make up for the moratorium by paying higher unemployment taxes to the states. Specifically, they will have to pay taxes on the first $15,000 of an employee’s income, instead of the current $7,000. But, even then, unemployment taxes will be at the same level, adjusted for inflation, as they were in 1983, when President Ronald Reagan raised them.

The administration is proposing to cut the federal unemployment tax rate in 2014 so that employers would pay the same amount to Washington as they do now. States, if they choose to do so, could collect more from each employer to repay the federal government and restock their own unemployment trust funds.

….

The full details of the plan’s costs and benefits will be available when President Obama submits his 2012 budget to Congress next week. When he does, both parties should take a close look at the numbers and seize the opportunity to keep this fundamental safety net solvent.

“It is a major step forward for the President’s FY 2012 budget to address the UI trust fund crisis,” said Andrew Stettner, deputy director of the National Employment Law Project and a co-author of the new joint NELP-CBPP policy proposal.  “Our proposal rests on the same core principles — giving employers and states relief now while taking concrete steps to restore the long term solvency of the UI trust fund as the economy recovers.  The plan endorses two key aspects of what the Administration’s proposal reportedly includes — raising the taxable wage base up from the inadequate, outdated level of $7,000 and endorsing a two-year moratorium on federal UI tax increases.”

The NELP-CBPP plan, detailed in a new report, would enable states to restore the solvency of their UI trust funds, avoid significant tax increases on employers during a weak economy, and prevent damaging cuts in UI eligibility and benefits for jobless workers, without increasing the deficit.  The plan also suggests additional debt relief for states and positive incentives for employers, rewards states that have maintained sound financing packages, and builds on existing federal protections of state benefit levels.

In a statement, the groups provide a summary of the plan:

• The federal government would gradually raise the amount of a worker’s wages subject to the federal UI tax (i.e., the FUTA taxable wage base). This would automatically raise the floor for the taxable wage bases in the states which by law cannot be lower than the federal wage base, helping those states rebuild their trust funds. (The federal UI tax rate would fall, however, so that overall federal UI taxes did not go up.)

• The federal government would provide a moratorium, until 2013, on state interest payments on their UI loans.

• The federal government would also postpone, for two years, the FUTA tax increases required to recoup the loan principal in borrowing states.

• The federal government would offer immediate rewards and future incentives for states that currently have and continue to maintain adequate trust fund levels.

• The federal government would excuse a state from repaying part of its loan if the state (a) enters a flexible contractual agreement with the U.S. Labor Department to rebuild its trust fund to an appropriate level over a reasonable number of years, and (b) agrees to maintain UI eligibility, benefit levels, and an appropriate tax rate over the loan-reduction period.

This plan would produce the following benefits:

• Employers would not pay higher federal UI taxes until the beginning of 2014, saving them $5 billion to $7 billion while the economy remains weak and $10 billion to $18 billion over the next five years. Also, employers would pay no additional assessments to cover interest payments in 2011 or 2012, saving them $3.6 billion.

• In addition, partial loan forgiveness that comes from a state’s commitment to build adequate trust funds would save employers about $37 billion by the end of the decade. Counting the interest payments on this principal as well, employers could save as much as $50 billion.

• All or nearly all states would assume a path to permanent solvency.

• Employers in responsible states would receive concrete rewards and a more level playing field between the states.

• Adequate trust funds would stabilize UI tax rates over time, avoiding the roller-coaster tax rates common in many states — very low during healthy economic times, rising rapidly during recessions — that harm businesses and the economy.

• States would maintain current UI benefit and eligibility levels.

• The federal deficit would not rise as a result of these policies.

“States face a tremendously urgent crisis when it comes to their unemployment insurance trust funds,” said Michael Leachman, assistant director of the Center’s State Fiscal Project and co-author of the report. “If federal policymakers address this crisis using our plan, employers could save as much as $50 billion in taxes and states would maintain the critical benefits they provide to people who lose their jobs.”

 

Washington Post Staff Writer
Friday, September 4, 2009; 9:27 AM  

The job market continued its long, steep decline in August, with the jobless rate soaring to 9.7 percent and employers continuing to shed jobs, albeit at a slower rate than expected.

This Story
  • Unemployment Rises to 9.7 Percent; 216,000 Jobs Lost in August
  • Stimulus Credited for Lifting Economy, But Worries About Unemployment Persist
  • Stimulus Status

Analysts generally believe that economic output began rising by late summer. But new Labor Department data released Friday morning shows that that improvement isn’t yet flowing through to the job market, as employers remain highly reluctant to add staff.

The rise in the unemployment rate rose to 9.7 percent in August, from 9.4 percent in July, resumed a steep upward path that has been only rarely interrupted since the recession began in December 2007. Employers shed 216,000 net jobs, significantly better than the revised 276,000 jobs lost in July and less than the 230,000 decline that forecasters expected.

The tally now stands at 6.9 million jobs lost since the beginning of the recession in December 2007. A broader measure of joblessness rose even more sharply than the headline unemployment rate. An expanded unemployment rate that includes people who have given up looking for a job out of frustration and who are working part time but want a full-time job rose to 16.8 percent, from 16.3 percent.

The rate of job losses has been declining, if haltingly, since winter. The August numbers, bad as they are, do offer hope that job losses will continue tapering off. Economists generally consider the job loss numbers to be a more reliable month-to-month barometer of the economy than the unemployment rate, and that measure indicated the slowest rate of job loss since August 2008.

The report also said that the average workweek was unchanged at 33.1 hours. Employers have cut back on hours in the current downturn, in addition to cutting jobs entirely, and are expected to have existing employees work longer hours before bringing new people onto their staffs. The hours-worked number confirms that employers have stopped cutting back hours but gives no evidence they are starting to expand hours yet.

Among the most positive signs in the report, average earnings for non-managerial workers rose 0.3 percent in August, the Labor Department said.

The job losses, though lower than in recent months, remained broad-based. The construction industry cut 65,000 jobs, in line with the recent trend. Manufacturing companies cut 63,000 jobs. The health-care sector, as it has throughout the recession, added jobs.

 

U.S. Initial Jobless Claims Rose 22,000 to 378,000  

As reported in Bloomberg .com

March 20 (Bloomberg) — The number of Americans filing first-time claims for unemployment insurance rose last week and the total number on benefit rolls reached the highest since August 2004, signs that firings are increasing.

Initial claims for benefits increased 22,000 to 378,000 in the week ended March 15, more than economists forecast and the highest since the week of Jan. 26, from 356,000 the prior week, the Labor Department said in Washington. The number of people staying on benefits rose to 2.865 million from 2.833 million.

U.S. companies are cutting staff as the biggest housing slump in a quarter century, tighter credit and mounting financial losses push the economy toward a recession. The Federal Reserve, noting labor markets had “softened” as it cut interest rates earlier this week, said it would act “as needed” to promote growth.

“This is pretty much what it looks like heading into recession,” Chris Rupkey, chief financial economist at Bank of Tokyo-Mitsubishi in New York, said in an interview with Bloomberg Television. “It’s a bad number for the Fed. This is something that might keep them cutting rates.”

Treasuries were little changed after the report, with the benchmark 10-year note yielding 3.33 percent.

Weekly claims were forecast to rise to 360,000 from 353,000 initially reported in the prior week, according to the median projection of 39 economists in a Bloomberg News survey. Estimates ranged from 345,000 to 380,000.

From a company’s perspective

Many companies look to firing or laying off employees to address a downfall in the economy. This may address an immediate need but many fail to realize that this decision lives with them for 4 years.

First, if an employee collects, the payments will be paid out of the State mandated company’s account. The state unemployment programs are set up to mirror that each company has their own checking account.

The state assigns a rate that tells you how much will be put into the account and then notifies you how much has been paid out in claims.

The amount paid out directly affects the balance or reserves held in the account and have a direct relationship in determining what your rate will be over the next 4 years. The state makes a calculation based on the dollar amount of claims paid out, the reserves needed to support future claims as they relate to the taxable wage base.

 Confused yet?

That is the way the states want you to view it.

Should you have any questions about the unemployment or claim process, feel free to contact us. We deal with these issues on a daily basis.

george@hbsadvantage.com

We find many clients have been assigned the wrong rate and our overpaying unemployment taxes.

To learn more visit our website.

www.hbsadvantage.com

We look forward to discussing this with you.